Birds and More | All Blogs


Quack! Quack!

By Nic.Korte

     I have a brother and sister. A family joke is that among us we have far more mechanical ability than most families--but my brother took all of it. As for birding, that’s me. My sister, the glue that holds the family together, showed her birding skills one time when I asked her what she had seen at a lake. At first birds didn’t occur to her. Then she realized she’d seen ducks. “What kind?” I asked. “I think one had a green head,” she replied. She didn’t even know she’d seen a mallard!
     How about you? Do you want to learn how to distinguish a mallard from this gadwall?

(Photo by Jackson Trappett)

     Join Grand Valley Audubon Society’s annual waterfowl field trip on November 23. Meet at Corn Lake State Park at 8AM. We will travel from east-to-west ending at Highline Lake in mid-afternoon. Everyone is invited. We collect $5/person except for youth who are free. You will need a State Parks Pass. This is a great trip for beginners because most of the birds are stationary and there will be several spotting scopes to share for long looks. Bob Bradley is the trip leader, and there will be other knowledgeable birders along to help. You can join us for all or part of the day. Expect to see some eagles and hawks as well as waterfowl.
     

     The subject of ducks can bring up the subject of hunting. Some folks are surprised to find that the National Audubon Society (NAS) is not anti-hunting. NAS supports scientific management of wildlife and realizes that hunting is part of that proper management. Some of birders favorite places are National Wildlife Refuges (NWF) where hunting is permitted. Consider nearby Browns Park NWF in Northwest Colorado. It is an easy place to see eagles, moose, and many types of waterfowl. Hunting occurs, but without the refuge, much of this wildlfie might not have a place to live. One way to support National Wildlife Refuges is to purchase a Duck Stamp. Dave Buchanan wrote in the October 20 Daily Sentinel that “when you buy a $15 Duck Stamp, as much as $14.70 goes to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund, which supports wetland acquisition for the National Wildlife Refuge System.” The Duck Stamp also covers your admission to the refuges. So, even if you don’t hunt or plan to visit a refuge, a duck stamp is money well spent. They are available at most sporting goods stores. I purchased mine on line at www.duckstamp.com. Buying a duck stamp provides more places to live for birds such as this Common Goldeneye—a bird we will see on our November 23 field trip.

(Photo by Jackson Trappett)

This post provided by Nic Korte with photos by Jackson Trappett, Grand Valley Audubon Society. Send questions/comments to nkorte1@hotmail.com]To learn more and to participate in the activities of Grand Valley Audubon, send an email to audubongv@gmail.com and “like” us on Facebook!]

 

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