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Product Review: JamBerry Nails

By Richie Ann Ashcraft
Friday, April 18, 2014

I'm taking the 7-day Jamberry Nails challenge this week.

Jamberry Nails is a direct sales company, similiar to Pampered Chef or Tupperware, that sells vinyl nail wraps. I was introduced to them by a friend and new consultant, Tessa Miller, who gave me a sample to try. The challenge is to wear the vinyl wrap, paint your other nails with polish, then see which lasts longer. The Jamberry nail is supposed to last up to three weeks, longer for pedicures.

That idea of course appeals to me. I don't always have time to paint my nails. Or maybe I don't even want to make the time. My hands are constantly in soapy water and garden dirt. So, as I told Tessa, this product is going to have to be pretty good to keep up with my kind of wear-n-tear.

I'll let you know how they hold up. In the meantime, check out the Jamberry website and tell me what you think.

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Her Countenance Alone

By Randee Bergen
Thursday, April 17, 2014

You've got to watch this video:

Dad Films His Daughter Every Single Week for 14 Years

In this video I saw my daughter, my other daughter, and every young girl I've taught over the past 20-some years. The faces, the expressions, her countenance - it's universal.

I was so moved it brought me to years and I had to write this:

 

Her Countenance Alone

It doesn’t matter who she is

Her name

Nor father that created this beautiful piece of art

What she’s saying

In all those seconds

Over all that time

Utterly inconsequential

What I study instead

Is her countenance alone

That face

Living, expressing, growing, changing

Yet persisting

And prevailing

As the baby girl

Expressing without words

No words to express

How she is every girl

Every baby grown up

Every stage

Each different

All the same

She is my daughter

My first daughter

My second

She is every girl

I’ve taught over the years

At some point talking

To me

Without me hearing

As

Her countenance alone

Captured me

Raptured me

Entitling me to see, just see

To appreciate

To love

Every stage

Of every girl

Each different

All the same.

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Books: Captain Underpants

By Richie Ann Ashcraft
Monday, April 14, 2014

We've rediscovered the library recently. We used to go all the time, but then the boys kind of outgrew the puppet shows, they weren't ready to read on their own, it closed for months and months, and our patronage gradually lapsed.

But, now all those things are all cured up and the Ashcraft family, all of five of us, have stepped back within the shelves. It's a land of new discovery for Soren and Jonas who can now read well and read voraciously. It makes me so happy.

I let them choose whatever they want. Books about LEGOS, Minecraft, choose-your-own adventure, and fun-facts are their very favorite. I don't even limit them to choose from the kids section. Last weekend Jonas brought home a book about the Colorado gold rush from the historical section because he liked the pictures. Fine by me.

Books their friends are reading are popular choices which include "Captain Underpants" by Dav Pilkey. Jonas just finished reading "Attack of the Talking Toilets." Just the title alone enthralled my kindergartener. Talking toilets — the wha?

This series is one of the most reviled by parents these days I guess according to an article today in the Associated Press.  Parents complain about the potty humor and other offensive antics of the two main characters that write their own comic book and get into general mischief at home and school.

Okay, I get that. But consider this — your kid chose a book called "Captain Underpants — Attack of the Talking Toilets." What did you think it was going to be about? I read a few chapters out loud with Jonas. The potty-talk isn't too bad and it makes him laugh. He's a boy. I know he's smart enough to know that what is read in a book isn't necessarily appropriate in real life. That's the joy in reading ... letting the 'what-if' and imagination run wild. Books wouldn't be nearly as interesting if they were all about good kids planting flowers and doing good deeds. Aww, isn't it sweet — but boring. Toilets attacking people — well, it's funny when you're six.

The thing that bothered me about the book wasn't even mentioned by the complaining parents in the article. My complaint is there are lots of mispelled words in the comic book sections. I get that the premise is that it's being written by kids, but misspelled words are a much greater concern to me than somebody saying poopy. How about that Dav Pilkey? Can you at least make them good spellers? That'd be great. Thanks.

3 comments

In sickness and in health

By Robin Dearing
Monday, April 14, 2014

Me to my husband, Bill: I don't expect you stay home with me when I'm sick ... but I sure do appreciate it.

Bill: There's no one I'd rather spend my time with.

I hope one day to deserve his genuine devotion.

In the meantime, I hope he knows how much his time and company mean to me.

2 comments

Just .1 Left

By Randee Bergen
Monday, April 14, 2014

Of course, a 5k can't be a perfect three miles; that’d make too much sense. A 5k is 3.1 miles long. But it’s that final .1 that’s so much fun. That final .1 when the finish line is in sight.


This weekend I labored through the last stages of my 5k. I’ve been steadily planning the Lincoln OM ROARing to Run 5k—a joint effort between Lincoln Orchard Mesa Elementary School and the Mesa Monument Striders running club—for the past four months. The event is happening next weekend, April 19, and I’ve only got a few days now to get all of the remaining details in place.


Just a short distance until I reach that final .1 of this run I’ve been running.


I want to say first of all that though this project has been like an extra half-time job for me, I have had a great time with it. The learning curve has been challenging and I’ve enjoyed thinking about how to make this race the best it can be.


Here are the highlights:
• a flat straightforward course starting and ending at the school
• low registration fees – just $5 for kids
• 30+ volunteers, with many of them on the course to help cheer on the runners and keep children safe
• post-race snacks
• raffle tickets for a kid’s mountain bike
• lots and lots of door prizes
• popcorn for sale
• the school’s bathrooms and drinking fountains handy
• music rocking the race scene
• covered areas in case of inclement weather
• finisher awards for all kids
• age group prizes
• the National Anthem


I’ve completed most of this race, meaning that I’ve put forth most of the mental and physical energy necessary for this race to happen. I’ve learned how to time races, ran several possible routes, secured insurance, checked into permits, created a website, designed a race t-shirt, set registration fees and age groups, selected awards, accepted and stockpiled donated door prizes, planned race day snacks and registration goodie bags, created and distributed flyers, organized a running club at the school to get the students fired up about and trained for the race, lined up volunteers, held committee meetings, and rounded up sponsors.


Thank you to the race committee that helped all of the above come to fruition.


This weekend I spent nearly 12 hours in my classroom (which doubles as my 5k planning and storage area) making signs, preparing the results boards, stuffing race bags, and sending emails to all the volunteers with their assignments and instructions.


I think I’ve got enough accomplished and feel ready enough to go with this event to say that the first three miles are done.


And now I’ve got just that final .1 to go. The super fun part, when I know that all of my hard work is going to pay off. The finish line is in site, right before my eyes. I’ll be crossing it next Saturday as the event starts, happens, and concludes.


I’m excited. I truly believe it’s going to be a fun time for all – runners and volunteers alike. And what an awesome way to build school-community relations and pride.


A shout-out to all the businesses that are supporting this race in various ways: Bicycle Outfitters, Mesa Monument Striders, Fiesta Guadalajara, Reddy Ice, Domino’s Pizza, Fairground Liquor and Wine, Meadowgold Dairy, Chipotle, Octopus Coffee, Supercuts, Smiles in There Photography, Randy’s Diner, A&R Enterprise, and Silo Adventure Center.


Looking for something to do next Saturday? Something healthy and fun and that supports a local school? Look no further than the ROARing to Run 5k!

www.roaringtorun5k.webs.com

 


 

2 comments

Wordless Thursday

By Robin Dearing
Thursday, April 10, 2014

2 comments

Strange satisfaction

By Robin Dearing
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

I freely admit that I take satisfaction in some pretty strange things. I love showing people when I've run a ball-point pen out of ink or used a pencil down to an unsharpenable nub.

No one cares about these things, but it feels like an accomplishment to me. So when I tackle a real job and get it done, I can hardly contain myself.

I had that feeling several times recently. Thursday and Friday, I worked in our much-neglected front yard. To make Bill happy, I cut back everything to tiny stumps. I'm loath to admit it, but he was right. The yard looks much better. The Russian sage, pampas grass, lavender all are neatly trimmed and free of as many of those evil elm seedlings as I could find. I tried to dig up as many of the volunteer hollyhocks as I could get and now that bed looks a bit bare. Luckily, the planting season is upon us. I can't wait to go the greenhouse to see what I can fill it up with.

The yard was a just one of the great accomplishments that happened more recently.

Saturday and Sunday, Bill and I (mostly Bill) cleaned out our garage. This is huge because our garage has been the universal dumping ground for all things useful and un-useful since we moved into our house over three years ago. It was packed with Bill's tools, my dad's tools, too many bikes, a couple motorcycles, discarded household items and various detritus from our lives. It rendered the garage completely functionless. It was impossible to find anything and there was no room to do anything in there even if you could find the right tools.

We took everything out of the garage and began organizing it. Then the negotiations began. I wanted to get rid of everything that didn’t have an immediate purpose. Bill wanted to keep a bunch of junk. We dickered and I took much glee in hauling unneeded items out to our junk pile in the front yard.

Oh yes, the junk pile. It’s that time of year again when the city of Grand Junction allows us to pile anything heading for the dump in our front of our house to be picked up in a couple of weeks. Of course, it becomes a crazy recycling program as pickers creep slowly through the neighborhoods searching piles for items that have value or can be reused.

I take strange satisfaction in that the fact that the pickers are going to love our pile this year. We’ve got a bunch of good stuff in there. The neighbor kids already gleaned a couple sets of golf clubs and a fish house. Now that I think about it, the old computer desk is already gone. Hope it went to a good home.

In his defense, Bill did agree to get rid of a fair amount of stuff, so I didn’t argue about a bunch of other stuff. Now, we still have too much stuff in the garage, but at least it’s organized now. Plus, we can actually get to the toolboxes and workbench.

I’m strangely proud of our almost-tidy garage — even more proud than I was when I used up another Bic softgel writing lectures this week.

2 comments

Hiking Underground

By Randee Bergen
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

My teenage daughters aren’t that into hiking – you know, exertion and sweat and covering ground just for the sake of covering ground – so any hike I planned for our Spring Break road trip had to be extra beautiful or unique. And short. I know they’re not planning on walking far when the sturdiest shoes they have along are their Vans. And so it was we found ourselves hiking in an underground lava river tube.

Lave River Cave is northwest of Flagstaff in the Coconino ponderosa forest. A rock pile and short rock wall marks the opening. It is small and drops downward immediately, giving us the feeling right from the start that maybe we didn’t want to do this hike after all.

I hung back, initially, to take photos of the girls entering the cave and dropping down into it, and then panicked a bit as I realized I was getting behind and that catching up would be difficult due to the big boulders on the floor. It seemed wrong to call out, “Wait up!” when the girls were just fifteen feet in front of me. I was happy when Addy said, “Come on, Mom, we’ll wait for you.”

Just before the cave floor leveled out, I turned back to get the last glimpse of daylight.

Now we seemed to be walking parallel with the Earth’s surface above us. We turned our headlamps off to check and, as expected, found ourselves in complete darkness. Most of the cave was wide and up to 30 feet in height, but portions of it got to as low as three feet.

The cave is 3/4 mile long, so 1.5 miles round-trip. A short hike, right? Yes, but a long time to be underground. At no point was it relaxing. For starters, we had to keep our headlamps trained on the ground right in front of us, which was rocky and uneven. Looking ahead required stopping, getting my balance, and moving my head rather than just my eyes wherever it is I wanted to look. And looking around wasn’t all that revealing. The cave walls and floor looked almost the same the entire way, giving few hints that progress had been made or that the end was approaching. And then there’s the fact that our minds started racing with all kinds of crazy thoughts.

Like a good mom should, I started worrying while driving down the forest roads to get to the cave. Were we the only ones out here? Would it be better to be alone in the cave or to have some other hikers in the area? If something happened and I needed to drive out of here quickly to get some help, would I be able to find my way back if in a state of panic? I dropped my mental breadcrumbs.

And as soon as we were in the cave: What if someone covers the opening with boulders? What if there’s an earthquake? What if today is the day the cave becomes unstable? It was only a 1.5 mile hike, so I didn’t bring water or snacks. I didn’t bring anything except an extra headlamp and the clicker to my vehicle. Bad hiker. Bad mom.

There were others ahead of us, we assumed, because there were two vehicles in the parking lot. And there was another family arriving as we were starting down the trail. You’d think you’d hear voices echoing throughout the cave. But no; it was eerily quiet. Was anyone hiding down here, just waiting to attack us? I thought about how hard it would be to run out of here, and the worst, having my headlamp knocked off and the batteries coming loose while struggling to get away from someone.

To cope with these irrational (maybe not so irrational?) ideas, we started acting really goofy. It started in a low section of the cave, where we had to bend over to continue moving forward. The girls’ hands touched the floor and then they were suddenly acting like gorillas. While they do plenty of strange things, I have not seen this particular behavior elicited anywhere above the earth’s surface.

Amy kept us laughing with possible journal entries, doubly funny because they were all for Day 1 – as if one day would be the extent of our survival in the event something horrible happened – and they all had the word growing in them. Day 1 – Some of us are growing hungry. Day 1 – The soles of my Vans are growing thin. Day 1 – My mother is growing crazier by the minute.

Addy tried to get our minds off the situation by writing raps. She would start and Amy and I were supposed to add to it. I wasn’t very good at it. I was slow to think of rhyming lines and was getting hung up on whether we were doing couplets or quatrains and what was a quatrain, again, anyway.

After what seemed like several miles, we finally reached the end. There was a large family there, or two. It was awkward visiting with them in the dark, nothing like stopping to talk with other hikers while in the daylight and nothing at all like celebrating with whomever you find when you finally reach the summit of a 14er.

We continued our silliness on the way back, but now that we were on our return trip it was more for the fun of it than for the sake of retaining our sanity.

I must say I was plenty relieved when I saw that shaft of sunlight, which was slow to come into view because it was above us (remember I said we had to go down at the beginning of the hike before it leveled off) and not in front of us.

Am I glad we went? Absolutely. Any short hike that is unique in some way is a hike worth taking.

What exactly is a lave river cave? According to Wikipedia, between 650,000 and 700,000 years ago, molten lava erupted from a volcanic vent. The top, sides, and bottom of the flow cooled and solidified, while lave continued to flow through, and out of, the middle, forming a cave. I don’t know how common lava river tubes are, but there is one near Bend, Oregon. Lumbermen discovered the Arizona lava river tube in 1915. I’m a little surprised that the area hasn’t been made into a national monument or park, to be honest. A sign outside the opening explains that there have been problems with litter and graffiti. It’s a pretty cool place and I’d hate to see it destroyed.

1 comments

Passport envy

By Robin Dearing
Friday, April 4, 2014

After my class on Tuesday, I jumped in my car and headed to Denver. (I may or may not have stopped at McDonald’s first and bought way too many Chicken McNuggets.) I was in a hurry and drove the entire 250 miles without stopping.

Four hours and one cracked windshield (darn you, loose blacktop) later, I pulled into the parking lot of Denver International Airport. Just as I was parking, my cell phone rang. It was Margaret. She was just about done with customs.

I hurried inside the terminal and found international arrivals. Moments later, there she was, my 13-year-old girl lugging her suitcases, all smiles.

Margaret spent nine days of her spring break touring England and France with a group from her middle school.

From the moment we dropped her off at the airport until I saw her beautiful face again, I remained both very happy and very emotionally bent up. Many times over those nine days, I did my “I’m so happy, I’m going to cry” thing.

I missed many opportunities to travel abroad when I was younger. I never made it priority and now here I am, a 43-year-old, art history professor who has never seen most of the things I teach in person. I wanted to make sure Margaret didn’t miss any opportunities.

While we were so happy Mar took this trip, Bill and I worried our fair share. Luckily, our worrying did the trick and she had a great trip with no major issues. And she had a great time.

For Christmas, Santa brought Mar a new camera with a megazoon lens which she used to take 945 pictures. Seriously, 945. Here are a few:

This is the view of Paris from the Eiffle Tower.

Giving my daughter these opportunities is the best part of being a parent.
This trip saw Margaret get three new stamps in her passport (they stamped it on their layover in Iceland, as well as England and France). Along with her Mexico stamps, she’s got four foreign stamps. I’m not afraid to admit I’m a bit jealous, but so very happy.

2 comments

Slide Rock State Park

By Randee Bergen
Friday, April 4, 2014

A beach scene in the middle of a mountain canyon? Sounds fun.

Slide Rock is in Arizona, south of Flagstaff and north of Sedona, in Oak Creek Canyon. The month of March is a bit early in the season to be playing in a mountain creek even in sunny, warm Arizona. I researched camping in the area and found just one campground nearby that was open, for tent camping, during March, another sign that it might not be the best time to visit. But this was the time we had to go – the last two weeks of March. I figured we could at least make a stop and do some hiking.

It was a warm, beautiful day as we drove through the northern Arizona desert, then up into the Ponderosa pine forests to Flagstaff and down the switchbacks into Oak Creek Canyon. We saw the area and many people enjoying it before we actually turned into the entrance. A sign there said that the air temperature was 74 and the water temperature 46.

“Are people actually playing in the water?” I asked the ranger.

“A few are. It’s a really nice spring day here. No clouds, no wind. So some brave souls are getting in.”

In the parking lot, I changed into water shorts and a shirt that could serve as a swimsuit top if need be. I wasn’t quite ready to don true swimwear. We walked a half mile before dropping into the rocky canyon area called Slide Rock. We crossed the creek a few times in ankle-deep water, on stepping stones and over short bridges. Then, we set our belongings down and found a place to test the water.\

The rocks beneath the crystal clear water were green and looked slippery with moss. I was worried about losing my balance and falling in, but the wet rock was surprisingly easy to walk on.

The water was indeed chilly, but it wasn’t long before I was meandering over to the top of the sliding area. As I got closer, I watched a few people sit themselves into the water, push off, and slide down the rock. They all drew their breath in quickly and grimaced, but soon switched to laughing, screaming, and smiling.

Some of the kids got out, rushed back to the top, and did it again. But they were kids. I found the one woman who was close to my age who had braved the water slide and got her opinion. She basically said it was awesome and that she could do it all day long.

All I needed to hear.

I gave my camera to my daughter, sat down, sucked my breath in, and pushed off. It wasn’t as slippery and slide-like as I thought it would be. Nor as cold. I had to push myself along in a few spots and this meant that I was sitting in the water longer than I had planned to.

But, when I hit the deep pool at the bottom and pulled myself to the side, I was smiling like the rest of them and thinking about doing it again.

I hear they have to close the gates in the summer because there are too many people. I could only imagine the line to slide on a hot Arizona day. So I was glad I did it on this early spring day while I was here.

Later, I noticed people on the cliff high above and set off to find the trail.

As I left the swimming area, some teens were cliff jumping into a large pool. If I was still wet, I would have tried it. Now I wish I would have anyway.

The views from above, on the trail, were incredible. What a fun spot!

 

 

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