Let's Get Dirty

A gardening blog for adults who still love to play in the dirt.

Send stories and pictures of your horticultural adventures to letsgetdirty@gjsentinel.com.

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Broccoli bust

By Penny Stine
Friday, October 19, 2012

 

 

 

To say I was disappointed in the broccoli and cauliflower I planted this year would be an understatement. Although my broccoli plants got huge... they never formed heads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instead, the few that did anything beside growing monstrous leaves formed little purple florets.

 


I planted Romanesco broccoli from Baker Creek Heirloom seeds and veronica cauliflower that I think I got from Park Seed. Both were supposed to form these spiral, apple green heads that tasted yummy.

 

 

Instead both types of plants simply got huge. And I forgot which was which, but it doesn't matter, since I didn't get much out of either one of them.

 

Although they could still form heads at this point in time, since both are cold-loving plants, I'm feeling doubtful that they will. So I picked all the little purple florets I could find and put them in a salad last night. It was rather strong on the broccoli flavor. I liked it, my husband wasn't a fan.

I've read that broccoli and cauliflower leaves are also edible, so I may take a bite, just to see if there's something I can salvage from this experiment.

 

 

 

Oh, as I was harvesting florets, I found one little perfect spiral head. Although it's cute, I was hoping for something bigger.  

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Don’t throw out those green tomatoes!

By Penny Stine
Thursday, October 11, 2012

If you've picked all your green tomatoes for fear of frost, and aren't really into fried green tomatoes, don't throw them away! If you put them in a paper sack (or just put them in a bowl or box in a tucked away location), they will eventually ripen. While they won't taste the same as those that ripened on the vine, they'll taste better than what you can buy at the grocery store. Even better, if you have boatloads of them, you can do this:

These are cherry tomatoes that I roasted at 305 degrees for about two hours. I sprinkled them liberally with kosher salt and pepper, tossed them with olive oil, tons of garlic and chopped basil and then stuck them in the oven and ignored the teasing smell. When the juice all evaporates away (and there will be a lot of it) and the skins are starting to get brown, they're probably done. You can eat them all at once, (they are truly delicious), freeze them in small plastic containers, freeze them on cookie sheets overnight and then dump the individual frozen, roasted tomatoes into gallon-size zipper bags (that's what I did) or make vats of tomato paste. 

I was making pizza the day I roasted these, and I processed a bunch of them in my food processor and used that (along with a little rosemary) for the pizza sauce. It was the best pizza sauce I've ever tasted. 

If you don't want to bother roasting your green tomatoes, please pass them on to me. Just don't expect me to share the tasty roasted ones with you!

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Squashed!

By Penny Stine
Wednesday, October 10, 2012

I think I read somewhere that you're supposed to pick winter squash before the first frost. I figured now was a good time and decided to arrange my lovely cucurbits for a family photo on the kitchen counter.

I know, right? What was I thinking in planting so many squash? Not included in this photo are the three pumpkins still on the vine on my straw bales. And I have already picked, cooked and either eaten or frozen two other winter squash I grew. I moved them to the living room, where they're artfully arranged on my coffee table because we haven't turned on the heat and it's the coldest room in the house. In another week when the daytime temps start getting a little cooler, I'll move them out to a shelf in the garage in hopes they live up to their name and store well for the winter.

No, my husband doesn't know I have plans to invade, conquer and occupy his precious garage space with vegetables.  

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First frost didn’t hit (or why you can’t trust everything you see on the TV news)

By Penny Stine
Monday, October 8, 2012

I know the end is coming soon, but I've been counting on a few more weeks for the garden. I've still got lots of green tomatoes, and I was checking the overnight forecasted lows all weekend. On Saturday, when I saw that everything (except the spaghetti squash in the straw bale) seemed to have survived Friday night, I decided not to pick everything in a panic.

After all, the weather was delightful, so I took another gamble that I wouldn't lose anything overnight. 

By Sunday, I was checking the National Oceanography and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website practically hourly, and it kept insisting that the low would be 34 degrees. So I didn't pick my green tomatoes, squash, peppers, basil, cucumbers, tomatillos, okra or anything else that was still out there and would die in a killing freeze. 

Then I made the mistake of watching the television news on Sunday night. The anchors went on and on about the freeze warning. They had a graphic showing the area (in blue!) that was supposed to freeze. My house was in the area. They had a table showing the previous two years' first frost compared to this year's projected date (that would be last night). They had enough information to put the fear of frost in me and make me wish I had picked all of my green tomatoes. 

I couldn't bear to look at my garden this morning before work. Well, actually, I went to work early and it was too dark to really see much of anything. 

So  I checked at lunch. 

Some of my basil didn't survive.

But, fortunately, most of it did. 

 

 

 

 

 

The frost seems to have damaged my tomatillos somewhat, but I think if I pick tonight, I'll be OK. And frankly, I've had plenty of tomatillos. How many jars of tomatillo sauce do I need?

While the cucumber plants look pretty well gone, I think the cucumbers themselves will be OK. 

Best of all, my tomato plants survived! Yes, I know, they will die soon, but in the meantime, they've got a few more days to ripen. And the NOAA forecast says 37 tonight. I refuse to listen to the television news. 

1 comments

Why I will miss garden season

By Penny Stine
Friday, October 5, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While there is no reason why I couldn't roast this exact combination of veggies and herbs once my garden has frozen, chances are good that I probably won't. I probably won't start purchasing beets (although I will continue growing them next season) and I probably won't do odd combinations of veggies in the winter. But when you have four green beans, seven beets, one potato, a handful of thyme, and an onion ready from the garden, along with some questionable carrots in the fridge, it's a perfect combination. And so pretty in the oven!

 

I will also miss this, which is not merely a photo of two small sweet potatoes, but two small sweet potatoes from the Silbernagel garden, after Bob and his wife decided to try growing sweet potatoes because I had to order too many plants from Park Seed. (Seriously, they only came in groups of 25 plants! Who needs 25 sweet potato plants?)

Sadly, my own sweet potato plants probably didn't produce. Most died right away. One got overshadowed by a zealous marigold and I just about killed the other one with too much fertilizer, because it was in one of my experimental straw bales and I got carried away. 

So in answer to my question, maybe I need 25 sweet potato plants. 

I have yet to dig under mine, but I'm not holding out much hope. In the meantime, Bob graciously shared two of his precious five potatoes produced by the first plant he dug. 

In the winter, no one leaves miscellaneous produce on my desk... 

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Page 65 of 133




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