Let's Get Dirty

A gardening blog for adults who still love to play in the dirt.

Send stories and pictures of your horticultural adventures to letsgetdirty@gjsentinel.com.

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Home is where your mom is

By {screen_name}
Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Nothing says home more than the word "mom" and her special day is coming up this Sunday. Make sure to brighten her world with some spring flowers, but don't get half dead cut roses from the grocery store. Make her something unusual, something that keeps saying I love you all summer long.
I've gathered a few container garden photos fromPinterest. You don't have to have a big budget to get her something unusual. A container garden can be started from old junk you already have in your yard, garage or closet.


How about raiding mom's kitchen to find the perfect container? Just make sure it's not something sentimental she is saving from her mother.












Confessions of a Curb Shopahollic has something to say for our curb cleanup program.







Antique milk containers make a beautiful picture of spilt milk from suprbo.com.











Don't throw away those old boots!  












Even junky cars can be turned into a work of art!
Have fun and use your imagination. Remember, mom knows the most special gifts were the ones you made for her.


Want onions?

By Penny Stine
Monday, May 7, 2012

I know I blogged about these last year, but they're just so cool I had to take pics again this year & post them. These are my walking onions, AKA perpetual onions, because they grow little bulbs out of the top (eventually, after they quit sending more green tops out) and plant more onions all around. 

I didn't harvest many last year because I wanted to give them a couple years to get established and plant lots of other onions. I think I can harvest a lot this year, since I took some of the bulbs and got a second onion patch established.

I say I garden because I like to eat and because it saves money, but really, sometimes I think it's for the sheer joy of planting something and watching it grow. Kind of like having kids, except plants can't talk back or roll their eyes at you. Plus, you don't have to worry about sending them to college!


I haven’t killed them yet!

By Penny Stine
Friday, May 4, 2012

Even though I finished the classroom portion of the Master Gardener program at CSU and am now doing the mandatory volunteer hours (so I'm supposed to know something), it still thrills to no end me every time a seed actually sprouts or I see plants growing just like they're supposed to in my garden. 

Or, in the case of these tomato, pepper and eggplant seedlings, on my deck. In the sunshine. I've been transitioning them to life outside all week. They've been in a shady area that gets early morning sun for about 45 minutes and diluted afternoon late afternoon sun for an hour or so. Today, I moved them out to a sunny spot on the deck before I left for work.

I ran home at lunch to check on them and make sure they weren't cooking. I was so happy to see them green and upright that I had to take a picture. I also moved them back into the shade, since I can't check on them periodically to make sure they don't get too scorched. 

As you can see, a few of the tomato plants got a little sun-bleached. The first year I started tomato plants from seed, I killed more than half of them by putting them in direct sun on their first day outside.

Tomorrow and Sunday these plants are getting even more sun.  

I can almost taste that first tomato...


New pesto recipes

By Penny Stine
Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Earlier this year, I included a recipe for mint pesto in our Spring Home and Garden section, which was published on April 8. It used both parsley and mint. I made the mistake of introducing both of them to a flower bed, and now it's a minty parsley bed.
When it comes to plants that want to take over the world, if you can't beat 'em, then you should try and eat 'em.
So I was happy when I saw the mint was big enough to start picking in this flower bed. I've also got it in two other beds, but it's not as big yet.  


I didn't want to go back and actually read the recipe (because I usually don't follow them anyway), so I made it up as I went along, adding the green tops of some garlic and what I later decided was too much parsley, as well as other ingredients listed below.






Once I had the pesto, I decided to make a pasta salad with the pesto as a dressing. I saw a recipe that called for orzo, mint pesto, feta cheese and ground lamb. Ground lamb was $7.99/lb at Safeway; chicken breasts were $1.99. I substituted grilled chicken breast, which I covered with pesto prior to grilling. I took the photo while the chicken was still grilling, so you'll have to use your imagination. 

The pasta salad was good, but because I used as much parsley as mint, it was almost too parsley-flavored for my taste buds. I decided to try making pesto out of just the mint. I changed up the recipe, substituting roasted, salted pumpkin seeds for the almonds.

For the ultimate taste test, I brought it to the Sentinel and made people taste both and vote on their fave. To my surprise, the results were fairly even. Eight people preferred the mint and parsley version while nine preferred the mint only version. I'm sure other people sampled and didn't vote, since I brought in two sleeves of Ritz crackers and they were gone before noon.

My hubby and I liked both, which thrilled me to no end. If you've got mint or parsley overtaking your herb or flower beds, try one of these recipes:
(Bear in mind that I never really measure anything, so everything is an approximation - add more or less to your taste.)


Spring mint pesto

3 - 4 cups mint leaves
1/2 C olive oil (could be more or less)
juice and zest of half a lemon
1/4 to 1/2 C roasted, salted pumpkin seeds
1/2 C feta cheese
1/2 to 1 tsp red pepper flakes
4 cloves garlic


Mint and parsley pesto

3 C mint leaves
3 C parsley
5 or 6 green tops of garlic (can also substitute garlic cloves, which will make it stronger)
1/2 C olive oil
juice and zest of half a lemon
1/2 C feta cheese
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1/4 to 1/2 C almonds


Some people thought the mint and parsley pesto was bland, others felt like it had more flavor. Try them both and see which one you like.  


Straw bale start-up

By Penny Stine
Tuesday, May 1, 2012

I'm experimenting with a straw bale garden this season at home and at a community garden at Northeast Christian Church on Patterson Road. We hauled straw bales over the weekend, and I decided to set three of them up at home.
I have the perfect spot in my yard to try growing a small straw bale plot. Technically, it's not my yard - it's in front of my fence and I think it's part of the street easement, but my irrigation cistern and my mailbox both sit out there. For the past 12 years, I have been trying to make something out of that patch of ground. It's full of weeds, and because I once scattered a wildflower mix out there, it's also full of sunflowers and cosmos. I planted iris bulbs last spring, so this year, it has iris, too. The soil is not amended and I want to quit spending money or effort on the area because it's not technically my yard.

It does, however, get fabulous afternoon and early evening sunshine. When we installed our hoses for drip irrigation, I ran a hose out over the entire area. So the area has water and sunshine, making it perfect for a straw bale experiment.


From talking to Theresa Mizushima, who planted a straw bale flower bed in the demonstration garden at Bookcliff Gardens a couple of years ago, I think the biggest challenge will be keeping the bales moist enough in July.



I had a pile of silty clay that I shoveled out of my irrigation cistern this spring and didn't know how to dispose of it. The clay is really good for retaining moisture. A light went on!

Proponents of straw bale gardening say the bales must be conditioned before you can plant anything. Conditioning involves giving them a quickstart to the decomposition process. You want them to decompose over the course of the growing season, which will provide a nice, warm comfy home for your garden plant's roots.

You can find steps for conditioning a straw bale online. I ordered a booklet from a guy in Minnesota who teaches straw bale techniques and am following his steps. It takes 10 - 12 days to condition the bales, which involves soaking the bales with water every day, and adding a small amount of nitrogen fertilizer with the water on other days. The nitrogen merely helps to speed up the decomposition. Today is day four for me, which is a water only day, according to his recommended steps.


Part of the appeal of straw bale gardening is supposed to be the lack of heavy labor - like rototilling, digging, hauling loads of compost or shoveling a mound of clay. Given that I had that mound of clay and I thought it would help me to have a successful straw bale garden, I decided to shovel. I'm pleased with how it looks, and think it will look even better with something growing on the top of the bale. When I stuck my hand in the bale last night before watering, it was still moist. Yay!

I'm thinking sweet potatoes, potatoes, melons, squash and a maybe some okra in the bales. 

Page 80 of 137


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