Let's Get Dirty

A gardening blog for adults who still love to play in the dirt.

Send stories and pictures of your horticultural adventures to letsgetdirty@gjsentinel.com.

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Summer’s bounty

By Carol Clark
Wednesday, September 22, 2010

My vegetable garden is finally producing like I dreamed it would when I planted it last spring. Just in time for autumn - which starts THURSDAY!

Strawberries are coming back on -



The chives have beautiful blooms -



The pumpkins are blooming but not turning to fruit :(



Fall lettuce is coming on -



Here is yesterday's harvest. Summer squash - can't be stopped!

Tomatoes - enough for eating AND fresh salsa. Green beans producing nicely, jalapenos, cucumber and tarragon. If we could keep this up all year, we could be self sufficient.
 

My heart is broken for the summer loss to come, but I am waiting in expectation for cool autumn days and changing colors.



"This is the best day the world has ever seen. Tomorrow will be better."
R.A. Campbell


 

4 comments

The Flowers of Home

By Geri Anderson
Tuesday, September 21, 2010

The Flowers of Home

I recently had opportunity to care for my mother's flower gardens.  Certainly it has given me a fresh appreciation of the hours of effort involved.  But I have also enjoyed their beauty--which varies by the time of day, the degrees of  light or shadow.

And, oh what pleasant memories accompany me when I walk my mother’s flower gardens. There’s the rose and flower garden with Mt. Lincoln in the background.

There are flowerbeds with spring flowers—like iris and spirea. There are mock orange bushes whose fragrance is heavenly when in bloom.

There is a talent in creating an outdoor space of beauty—and this yard has had my mother’s loving and talented touch for several decades, since before I was five.  (Certainly some time ago!--but I have no complaints--I became a grandmother Sunday---apparently another very fine joy of life!)

The rock gardens -- I remember my mother working in these in the early morning hours of lazy summer days.

One of my favorites--I love the masterful arrangement of colors, textures, flowers--altogether pleasant!

Simple asters.  Doesn't time in a flower garden calm our spirits and turn our thoughts pleasantly upward?

2 comments

September ought to be roasted chile month

By Penny Stine
Sunday, September 19, 2010

September is great for many reasons, and since moving here 10 years ago, I’ve learned another one: roasted chiles.
I don’t grow enough chile in my garden to roast my own, so I usually go to Okagawa Farms, although a bunch of other farms and markets roast them, too. I buy a bushel, ($25 this year for Sonora, College or Big Jim) which they are happy to roast and then put in a large plastic bag. Yeah, I know... the photo makes them look slightly icky. They smell delicious, though. Too bad this isn't a scratch 'n sniff blog.

This year, my husband agreed to help, so I picked up the chiles and brought them home and let them steam in the bag. We went for an all-day motorcycle ride while they steamed and cooled. It took us a couple of hours after the sun went down to peel the chiles and put them in bags. I think we usually do about four or five per bag. I didn't count, but we had quite a few bags to put in the freezer to use over the winter. 


I know that I’m not the only one who’s discovered the joy of locally grown and roasted chiles. One of my favorite ways to use them is in chicken enchiladas. My friend, Jan, dresses up a plain take & bake cheese pizza with chopped roasted chiles, making it so much more than plain cheese pizza.


What’s your favorite way to use roasted chiles?
 

2 comments

Wooly Winter?

By Carol Clark
Friday, September 17, 2010

So what's it going to be? A mild Western Colorado winter or a harsh frozen season? Legend says you have to go no further than the Woolly Bear Caterpillar. The Woolly Bear is the caterpillar form of the Isabella Moth and you can know fall has arrived when you see one.



Superstition says when the caterpillar's middle rust ring is narrow the winter will be severe. When its middle rust stripe is wider the winter will be more mild. A friend of mine has already seen one in the valley. They like to eat dandelions and maple leaves so this might be good places to find them.

I remember playing with these fuzzy friends when I was a lonely child on a Loma farm. So far from neighbors, crawly creatures were sometimes my only friend to play with. I put them in canning jars with holes in the lids and fed them grass, but you need patience if you are going to see him turn into a moth. Even after feeding him fresh grass daily and providing him with a stick to crawl on, he eventually got tired and hibernated at the bottom of the jar. (I always thought he was dead...and maybe he was!). Then you need to put him outside in a spot protected from the weather, like a covered porch. In the spring you need to add fresh grass again daily. The caterpillar will eventually wake up and spin a cocoon then you only have a week or two to wait and out will come a beautiful butterfly! (Technically a moth.)

This is a very long commitment for a child and maybe even for most adults. I prefer to let them roam free and find a place to sleep for the winter under a rock or some leaves.

Let us know what it says about winter if you see one.

SEPTEMBER
A road like brown ribbon,
A sky that is blue,
A forest of green
With the sky peeping through.
Asters, deep purple,
A grasshoppers call,
Today it is summer,
Tomorrow is fall.

Edwina Fallis

1 comments

Taking a Breather

By Laurena Mayne Davis
Thursday, September 16, 2010

One of the great joys of summer roadtrips, when you’re not the one driving, is the chance to catch up on some reading. Recently, during a 1,700-mile roadtrip through the desert Southwest, I finished reading this useful and inspirational organic gardening book given to me by sister-in-law, Carol. It was written by her friend, Peter V. Fossel:

I’d scanned it before and committed myself to not only rotating crops more often, but to planting “green manures,” or crops that are turned under in their green state to add nutrients to the soil. So earlier this summer I planted a crop of buckwheat barley in a patch of ground that has been heavily planted in vegetables for several years.
 

I bought the seed from Greenfields and just tossed it on the ground. With a little straw cover and water, it sprouted easily, tolerates heat well and is setting beautiful white blooms.
 

Because this part of the garden was due for a break, and because it is becoming more shaded by maturing apricot trees, I have designs to plant strawberries, rhubarb and asparagus there next year. In addition to adding nutrients to the soil, buckwheat has allelopathic properties, which means it suppresses weeds chemically, doing double duty.

Next year I think I’ll plant buckwheat where the super-sweet sweetcorn is this year, then I plan on resting and restoring with buckwheat a different section of the garden every year. The garden gets a break, I get a break and, with a little more free time, maybe I can catch up on some more reading.
 

2 comments
Page 103 of 115




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