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Squash throwdown

By Penny Stine

I can't grow zucchini. There, I've confessed. I heard Dixie Burmeister recently confess that she can't grow it, either, so I don't feel like a total failure as a gardener.

 I’m growing two different types of scallop squash this year and neither one is the standard pattypan that I’ve been growing for the last three years. I wanted to try something different, so I decided it was time to try some new scallop squash varieties.

 

I planted a few G-star hybrid squash from Park seed. The description said they were extremely prolific, do well in the heat and are resistant to powdery mildew. They’re dark green like a zucchini, but shaped like a pattypan.

 

 

 

 

I also planted a seed from Baker Creek Heirloom seeds called patisson panache jaune et verte scallop. I forgot everything I learned in my one year of high school French, but I think jaune et verte scallop simply means yellow and green scallop. No idea what patisson panache means. 

I chose it because the description said you could eat it like a summer squash when it was small and like a winter squash if you forgot about it and let it grow to plate-size proportions. It was also supposed to be yellow with green stripes, which I thought would look cool. And the name is already awesome, so there ya’ go.

 

 

So far, I’ve discovered that the dark green squash has very few seeds (a big plus) and tastes slightly better, in my opinion (also shared by my son and one of his buddies, who was eating dinner with us one night when we were eating stuffed squash). The green squash has more squashy flesh, since it has fewer seed goo.

 

Both are producing well and both have that lovely, flying saucer look that I love in a pattypan. I’ll also use both as zucchini substitutes later this summer when I start baking chocolate zucchini bread to store in the freezer for winter consumption.
Unless the heirloom one is amazing when baked as a winter squash, I think I’ll just go with the G-star hybrid next year.
Unless, of course, I see some other squash seed that I want to plant in my experimental garden.

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