The Outdoor Junkie | All Blogs


Ears of the Earth

By Ann Driggers

This spring it appears pasqueflowers, also known as the prairie crocus, are all over the place. I don't remember them being so prevalent in previous years. Exclamations of joy at their sight are a common occurance on our trail runs. Not only are they so beautiful and delicate they are the first flowers that we really see here in the high country. The Ute indians called them the "ears of the earth" as they listen for the coming of spring. The indian legend of the how the crocus came to be is here. In short the flower, then a simple white one, was granted three wishes for giving friendship to an indian boy during several cold early spring nights. The flower said "I would like to have the warmth and beauty of the yellow sun at my heart, the grace of all the purple mountains around me and a heavy fur robe to keep me warm."

My friend Janis is quite the poet so I challenged her to write a poem about the ears of the earth. Here are her wonderful words:

Romanticizing Nature

Natives named them
"Ears of the earth"
The purple-blue petals
Putting on alluring armor
Pushing, through frosty soil

Angelic hairs around each
Perfectly freckled flower
Resemble ears of cats or deer
It isn't entirely unbelievable
That flowers listen to the wind
For a rustle of summer
Or something...
Perhaps the hungry hum
Of hovering wings

The ripping cold winds
Encourage delicate heads to
Pull protective petals inward
Pasques are amongst
The first to risk
Remnants of winter

Now they are opening, offering
Sweet parts to pollination
To something like love.

~~~ Janis
 

COMMENTS

Please Login or Register to leave a comment.




Recent Posts
Obscure Basquiat Record Reissued for Black Friday Record Store Day
By David Goe
Thursday, November 27, 2014

Thrifty Christmas Gifts continued
By Julie Norman
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: Little brother armor
By Richie Ann Ashcraft
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Get your (control) freak on
By Melinda Mawdsley
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

The last harvest
By Penny Stine
Monday, November 24, 2014


TOP JOBS




THE DAILY SENTINEL
734 S. Seventh St.
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-242-5050
Editions
Subscribe to print edition
E-edition
Advertisers
Sign in to your account
Information

© 2014 Grand Junction Media, Inc.
By using this site you agree to the Visitor Agreement and the Privacy Policy