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Canine treachery

By Debra Dobbins

Cartoonist Darby Conley has fun today with allusions to lines in Shakespeare’s drama, “Julius Caesar.”

“Et tu, canis” riffs on the line, “Et tu, Brute,” spoken by the dying Caesar to his friend, Brutus, who has participated in the plot to assassinate Caesar. It means, “And you, Brutus?” or “Even you, Brutus?”

Wikipedia notes there is no evidence that Caesar actually said this as he was being murdered in 44 BC by a group of senators. Shakespeare and Shakespeare only can be credited for the pithy line. “Canis,” by the way, is Latin for dog.

“I come to inoculate Bucky, not to praise him” is a spoof on Marc Antony’s lines from Act 3, Scene II:

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.”
 

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