What's in a Word | All Blogs


Gabbing, British-style

By Debra Dobbins

Natter is more commonly used in Great Britain than it is here in America. It means to talk informally. Synonyms include schmooze, chat, gab and yammer, but they do not quite capture the tender whimsy of natter.

Natter brings up images of nannies sitting on park benches or good friends having a spot of tea in front of a cozy fire … with, of course, rain falling outside. Those who natter may talk “nineteen to the dozen,” another British expression meaning to speak rapidly.

“Natter” can be used a noun, too, as in “There’s nothing like a good natter.” Truer words were never spoken!

Photo special to the Sentinel
 

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