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Grantor vs. grantee

By Debra Dobbins

The Frank and Earnest cartoon today has fun with the name of a famous American. The Battle of Appomattox was one of the last Civil War battles; it was fought April 9, 1865. The general on the winning side was Ulysses S. Grant, the commander of the Union forces. He would become the 18th president of the United States.

A grant is something that is given, such as "property, a tract of land, an exclusive right or power, money from a fund, etc.,” according to Webster’s. Teachers, for example, often write proposals for grant money from charitable foundations.

Grant may also be used as a verb. For instance, a genie might say “I’ll grant your wish.” Here, the genie is a grantor, someone who makes the grant. (See blog of Oct. 12 for other words with the “or” suffix.)

The person receiving the grant is the grantee. Can you think of other people who are described in words that end with the “ee” suffix? Check Monday’s blog for some answers.

In the meantime, as promised Wednesday, here are some synonyms for diminutive: little, small, miniature, miniscule, minute, petite, teeny, tiny, teeny-weeny, teensy-weensy and wee.

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