Keeping spirits bright

Tease Image
Photo by Gretel Daugherty

Even at mid-afternoon on Tuesday, the line at the main U.S. Post Office on Fourth Street stretches out the door and into the lobby as people hasten to get Christmas packages into the mail.


Shippers, senders cope with holiday package surge

Tom Loomis watched the lines surge and thin out all day Tuesday at Grand Junction’s main post office.
“They come in bunches, there’s just so many people,” said Loomis, ringing the bell and collecting donations near the post office’s front door for the The Salvation Army. “I try to make them as happy as I can by being nice to them.”
During the year’s busiest week for sending packages and mail, lines stretched to the door at the office Tuesday, 241 N. Fourth St.

Gas industry warns of closures with fines

Colorado oil and gas regulators on Tuesday postponed a decision on a new fine structure for rule violations, after industry representatives voiced concern that it could lead in some cases to companies shutting down or curtailing operations.




NEWS »
OPINION »

SPORTS & OUTDOORS »
LIFESTYLE & ENTERTAINMENT »

POLL
Do you think the CIA should have used waterboarding and other harsh tactics to interrogate 9/11 prisoners?


Search More Jobs


NIE
Newspapers In Education


COLORADO »
  • Colorado funds medical marijuana research, a first

    DENVER (AP) — Colorado awarded more than $8 million for medical marijuana research Wednesday, a step toward addressing complaints that little is known about pot's medical potential.

  • Colorado teen to get 10 years for killing father

    EAGLE, Colo. (AP) — A 14-year-old Colorado boy will spend 10 years behind bars after pleading guilty to killing his father and trying to conceal the slaying for six days by keeping the body at home and telling the man's employer he was sick.

  • Expert: Killing shows strict police vetting needed

    DENVER (AP) — The discovery that a Cleveland officer who shot and killed a 12-year-old boy last month had washed out at another police force highlights what some experts call an unnerving truth about policing: Departments don't always dig deeply enough into recruits' pasts.

  • Southwest bag workers picketing over flight delays

    DENVER (AP) — Saying Southwest Airlines is neglecting workers and its customers, baggage handlers are bringing attention to the company's slide in on-time performance as they seek a new contract.

  • Southwest bag workers picketing over flight delays

    DENVER (AP) — Saying Southwest Airlines is neglecting workers and its customers, baggage handlers are bringing attention to the company's slide in on-time performance as they seek a new contract.

NATION »
  • NYC premiere of Rogen film canceled as threats fly

    NEW YORK (AP) — The blow that the hacking attack has dealt Sony is spreading beyond the entertainment corporation itself to theater chains and movie goers alike. And the financial toll is adding up too.

  • Obama: US re-establishing relations with Cuba

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama announced the re-establishment of diplomatic relations with Cuba on Wednesday and declared an end to America's "outdated approach" to the communist island in a historic shift aimed at ending a half-century of Cold War enmity.

  • Released from Cuba, Alan Gross says freedom is not free

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Alan Gross emerged Wednesday from five years of captivity in Cuba praising the Cuban people and offering a lesson he said he learned: Freedom is not free.

  • 14 charged in deadly 2012 meningitis outbreak

    BOSTON (AP) — In the biggest criminal case ever brought in the U.S. over contaminated medicine, 14 former owners or employees of a Massachusetts pharmacy were charged Wednesday in connection with a 2012 meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people.

  • Expert: Killing shows strict police vetting needed

    DENVER (AP) — The discovery that a Cleveland officer who shot and killed a 12-year-old boy last month had washed out at another police force highlights what some experts call an unnerving truth about policing: Departments don't always dig deeply enough into recruits' pasts.

NIE












THE DAILY SENTINEL
734 S. Seventh St.
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-242-5050
Editions
Subscribe to print edition
E-edition
Advertisers
Sign in to your account
Information

© 2014 Grand Junction Media, Inc.
By using this site you agree to the Visitor Agreement and the Privacy Policy