Genealogist uncovers hidden stories in 1930s quilts

This quilt in the traditional Dresden Plate pattern was completed over three generations. Jennie Parish pieced the blocks and her Happy Hour Club friends signed them in the mid-1930s. Many years later, her daughter, Mary Parish Berg, pieced them together, and in 1989, Jennie’s granddaughter, Alice Berg Parrish of Wray, hand-quilted it while undergoing treatment for breast cancer. She remains a cancer survivor.



081113_2d_dresden_plate

This quilt in the traditional Dresden Plate pattern was completed over three generations. Jennie Parish pieced the blocks and her Happy Hour Club friends signed them in the mid-1930s. Many years later, her daughter, Mary Parish Berg, pieced them together, and in 1989, Jennie’s granddaughter, Alice Berg Parrish of Wray, hand-quilted it while undergoing treatment for breast cancer. She remains a cancer survivor.

The term “happy hour” connotes that familiar revelry many working folks enjoy after a hard 9-to-5 day at the office or in the trenches. It’s become a marketing pitch for…




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