GYM: Neutral Spine

Neutral Spine The concept of neutral spine has been mentioned numerous times since the inception of Get Yourself Moving. Neutral spine is the natural position of the spine when all three curves of the spine — cervical (neck), thoracic (middle) and lumbar (lower) — are in good alignment. This is the ideal position for maximizing performance and maintaining spinal health. Neutral spine is fairly easy to achieve in the supine (face up, horizontal) position. In an upright position, a good measure is to align a stick horizontally with the tailbone (sacrum), thoracic curve and back of the cranium (skull) touching the stick. Individuals often are told to press the lower back to the floor to protect the back. In actuality, this trains the spinal column to be straight at the point of engagement, takes away the natural shock absorbing qualities of the spine and sets the individual up for injury.



Neutral Spine The concept of neutral spine has been mentioned numerous times since the inception of Get Yourself Moving. Neutral spine is the natural position of the spine when all three curves of the spine — cervical (neck), thoracic (middle) and lumbar (lower) — are in good alignment. This is the ideal position for maximizing performance and maintaining spinal health. Neutral spine is fairly easy to achieve in the supine (face up, horizontal) position. In an upright position, a good measure is to align a stick horizontally with the tailbone (sacrum), thoracic curve and back of the cranium (skull) touching the stick. Individuals often are told to press the lower back to the floor to protect the back. In actuality, this trains the spinal column to be straight at the point of engagement, takes away the natural shock absorbing qualities of the spine and sets the individual up for injury.



Neutral Spine

The concept of neutral spine has been mentioned numerous times since the inception of Get Yourself Moving.

Neutral spine is the natural position of the spine when all three curves of the spine — cervical (neck), thoracic (middle) and lumbar (lower) — are in good alignment. This is the ideal position for maximizing performance and maintaining spinal health.

Neutral spine is fairly easy to achieve in the supine (face up, horizontal) position.

In an upright position, a good measure is to align a stick horizontally with the tailbone (sacrum), thoracic curve and back of the cranium (skull) touching the stick.

Individuals often are told to press the lower back to the floor to protect the back.

In actuality, this trains the spinal column to be straight at the point of engagement, takes away the natural shock absorbing qualities of the spine and sets the individual up for injury.


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