GYM: Neutral Spine Push-up Progression

Neutral Spine Push-up Progression The following modification on the push up focuses on a neutral spine and engaged core, when done properly, and increases the stability of the muscles supporting the spine. Start in a high plank position. Slowly lower yourself to the floor with your knees and hips being the last to touch the floor. Bend at your knees, anchor your core without holding your breath and push up maintaining a neutral spine. Drop your toes back to the floor and rise into the high plank position. Be careful not to let your back sway as you lower or push up. Repeat for 8–12 reps. You can increase the effectiveness and difficulty by raising your heart rate so the diaphragm is not available to support the spine. Another variation is to alternately raise one foot slightly off the ground as you lower yourself to the floor.



Neutral Spine Push-up Progression The following modification on the push up focuses on a neutral spine and engaged core, when done properly, and increases the stability of the muscles supporting the spine. Start in a high plank position. Slowly lower yourself to the floor with your knees and hips being the last to touch the floor. Bend at your knees, anchor your core without holding your breath and push up maintaining a neutral spine. Drop your toes back to the floor and rise into the high plank position. Be careful not to let your back sway as you lower or push up. Repeat for 8–12 reps. You can increase the effectiveness and difficulty by raising your heart rate so the diaphragm is not available to support the spine. Another variation is to alternately raise one foot slightly off the ground as you lower yourself to the floor.



Neutral Spine Push-up Progression The following modification on the push up focuses on a neutral spine and engaged core, when done properly, and increases the stability of the muscles supporting the spine. Start in a high plank position. Slowly lower yourself to the floor with your knees and hips being the last to touch the floor. Bend at your knees, anchor your core without holding your breath and push up maintaining a neutral spine. Drop your toes back to the floor and rise into the high plank position. Be careful not to let your back sway as you lower or push up. Repeat for 8–12 reps. You can increase the effectiveness and difficulty by raising your heart rate so the diaphragm is not available to support the spine. Another variation is to alternately raise one foot slightly off the ground as you lower yourself to the floor.



Neutral Spine Push-up Progression The following modification on the push up focuses on a neutral spine and engaged core, when done properly, and increases the stability of the muscles supporting the spine. Start in a high plank position. Slowly lower yourself to the floor with your knees and hips being the last to touch the floor. Bend at your knees, anchor your core without holding your breath and push up maintaining a neutral spine. Drop your toes back to the floor and rise into the high plank position. Be careful not to let your back sway as you lower or push up. Repeat for 8–12 reps. You can increase the effectiveness and difficulty by raising your heart rate so the diaphragm is not available to support the spine. Another variation is to alternately raise one foot slightly off the ground as you lower yourself to the floor.



QUICKREAD

Allen Russell is a certified personal trainer at Crossroads Fitness Centers. For information on training with Allen or to learn more, text “perform” to 77094. Pictured: Kelsey Schlagel.



Neutral Spine Push-up Progression

The following modification on the push up focuses on a neutral spine and engaged core, when done properly, and increases the stability of the muscles supporting the spine.

Start in a high plank position. Slowly lower yourself to the floor with your knees and hips being the last to touch the floor. Bend at your knees, anchor your core without holding your breath and push up maintaining a neutral spine. Drop your toes back to the floor and rise into the high plank position. Be careful not to let your back sway as you lower or push up.

Repeat for 8–12 reps. You can increase the effectiveness and difficulty by raising your heart rate so the diaphragm is not available to support the spine. Another variation is to alternately raise one foot slightly off the ground as you lower yourself to the floor.


COMMENTS

Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


TOP JOBS
Search More Jobs





THE DAILY SENTINEL
734 S. Seventh St.
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-242-5050; M-F 8:00 - 5:00
Editions
Subscribe to print edition
E-edition
Advertisers
Advertiser Tearsheet
Information

© 2016 Grand Junction Media, Inc.
By using this site you agree to the Visitor Agreement and the Privacy Policy