GYM: Sit Press

Sit Press Similar to the Squat Press from last week, start in a standing position with a dumbbell in each hand held at waist height with a bench behind you. Sit down on the bench keeping your weight centered on your feet. As you sit, press the dumbbells overhead while maintaining a neutral spine. As you stand, maintain your body in a nearly vertical position with your core engaged to maintain a neutral spine. The tendency will be to lean forward. The dumbbells should travel in a nearly vertical plane. When the dumbbells are overhead, your palms should be facing forward. This not only is the maximal functional range of motion for the shoulder, but it also opens the chest and moves the contraction to the back, which helps with balance and posture. Pulling the weights directly down helps to keep the engagement in the back and helps to strengthen the ability to stand without leaning forward. The result should be a neutral spine throughout the movement. Complete three sets of 12–15 repetitions with a one-minute break between each set. You may want to jog in place or invisible jump rope (pretending to jump rope without a rope) during the break.



Sit Press Similar to the Squat Press from last week, start in a standing position with a dumbbell in each hand held at waist height with a bench behind you. Sit down on the bench keeping your weight centered on your feet. As you sit, press the dumbbells overhead while maintaining a neutral spine. As you stand, maintain your body in a nearly vertical position with your core engaged to maintain a neutral spine. The tendency will be to lean forward. The dumbbells should travel in a nearly vertical plane. When the dumbbells are overhead, your palms should be facing forward. This not only is the maximal functional range of motion for the shoulder, but it also opens the chest and moves the contraction to the back, which helps with balance and posture. Pulling the weights directly down helps to keep the engagement in the back and helps to strengthen the ability to stand without leaning forward. The result should be a neutral spine throughout the movement. Complete three sets of 12–15 repetitions with a one-minute break between each set. You may want to jog in place or invisible jump rope (pretending to jump rope without a rope) during the break.



QUICKREAD

Allen Russell is a certified personal trainer at Crossroads Fitness Centers. For information on 
training with Allen or to learn more, text “perform” to 77094. Pictured: Kelsey Charlesworth.



Sit Press

Similar to the Squat Press from last week, start in a standing position with a dumbbell in each hand held at waist height with a bench behind you.

Sit down on the bench keeping your weight centered on your feet. As you sit, press the dumbbells overhead while maintaining a neutral spine.

As you stand, maintain your body in a nearly vertical position with your core engaged to maintain a neutral spine.

The tendency will be to lean forward. The dumbbells should travel in a nearly vertical plane.

When the dumbbells are overhead, your palms should be facing forward. This not only is the maximal functional range of motion for the shoulder, but it also opens the chest and moves the contraction to the back, which helps with balance and posture.

Pulling the weights directly down helps to keep the engagement in the back and helps to strengthen the ability to stand without leaning forward. The result should be a neutral spine throughout the movement.

Complete three sets of 12–15 repetitions with a one-minute break between each set. You may want to jog in place or invisible jump rope (pretending to jump rope without a rope) during the break.


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