Geological study cuts tamarisk a break

This photo of Chinle Wash in Canyon de Chelly National Monument shows the extent to which tamarisk dark green foliage) and Russian olive trees (gray-green foliage) dominate the floodplain. Bands of native Fremont cottonwood (bright green trees) grow on the outer margins.



050510outTamarisk

This photo of Chinle Wash in Canyon de Chelly National Monument shows the extent to which tamarisk dark green foliage) and Russian olive trees (gray-green foliage) dominate the floodplain. Bands of native Fremont cottonwood (bright green trees) grow on the outer margins.

Tamarisk, a Eurasian transplant that’s taken over riparian areas throughout the West and long been disparaged as a water waster and unfriendly to native wildlife, may be getting a small…




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