Grand Junction man announces his 2012 bid for president

John Davis, owner of Blue Star Industries, has announced that he will run for president in 2012. Later this year, Mesa County residents will receive letters from Davis explaining his candidacy.



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John Davis, owner of Blue Star Industries, has announced that he will run for president in 2012. Later this year, Mesa County residents will receive letters from Davis explaining his candidacy.

John Davis plans to visit all 3,200 counties in the United States as part of his march to become the 45th president of the United States.

Davis is the head of Blue Star Industries in Grand Junction, which sells building materials and supplies, but probably is best known to many in Grand Junction as the place with the 160-foot flagpole at 2350 G Road.

The father of six, grandfather of four and husband of 30 years said he decided to seek the presidency because “we need a change.”

Davis declared his intentions Sunday with a full-page ad in The Daily Sentinel and will make an announcement on Monday in front of the Mesa County Courthouse, where, coincidentally, President George H.W. Bush once spoke.

Later this year, Mesa County residents will receive letters from Davis explaining his candidacy.

Eventually, he hopes to garner national news coverage and see his campaign take off from there.

“We’ve got a very aggressive agenda,” Davis said.

He’s not bypassing the normal routes, Davis said. He’s aiming first to garner the Republican nomination rather than seeking a third-party or independent run.

Taking a cue from former Speaker Newt Gingrich, he has his “Contract to America” posted on his site, http://www.johndavisforpresident.com.

The site features Celine Dion, a Canadian, singing “God Bless America,” but Davis said he doesn’t worry about the singer’s nationality.

“All I hear is red, white and blue,” he said.

The six points of his contract call for a balanced budget, term limits, upholding the Constitution, common-sense leadership, less government, and border control, work visas and citizenship for legal residents.

Once in the White House, he said, he’ll post a sign declaring, “As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.”

Though his disagreement with President Barack Obama’s policies prompted him to seek the job, Davis said he harbors no animosity.

“He’s a good president,” Davis said, “but he’s got some terrible ideas.”

Davis spent about $1,000 fashioning and mailing a letter to the president offering to meet and pray with him.

The letter was 5-feet-by-3-feet, so it should have been hard to ignore.

Still, Davis said, he’s had no response, “Not even a postcard.”

Davis, a 1975 Central High School graduate, has run his construction and development business since 1979, and said government has grown out of control.

Government regulations cost him about $100,000 a year without doing anyone any good, he said.

To meet his goal, he’ll have to visit about four counties a day starting now, but, he said, he can do it the same way he built his business: “You do one thing at a time.”

Ultimately, Davis said, “I don’t want to be president.” He is, after all, looking forward to getting his instrument certification as a pilot and other goals.

But, he said, “I’ve always wanted to serve my country.”



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