Keys to City project unlocks musical curiosity

DEAN HUMPHREY/The Daily Sentinel—Dexter McCammon, 2½, plays one of the four pianos placed along Main Street in downtown Grand Junction for Keys to the City: Street Piano Project, which is an undertaking of the Grand Junction Symphony Orchestra. The idea is modeled after similar projects on some of the world’s largest cities, according to the executive director of the Grand Junction Symphony, Kelly Anderson.



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DEAN HUMPHREY/The Daily Sentinel—Dexter McCammon, 2½, plays one of the four pianos placed along Main Street in downtown Grand Junction for Keys to the City: Street Piano Project, which is an undertaking of the Grand Junction Symphony Orchestra. The idea is modeled after similar projects on some of the world’s largest cities, according to the executive director of the Grand Junction Symphony, Kelly Anderson.

CHRISTOPHER TOMLINSON/The Daily Sentinel—From left, Jedediah Tatom, 3, Anthony Tatom, 5, and Charles Tatom, 4, brothers from Grand Junction, share one of the Main Street pianos.



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CHRISTOPHER TOMLINSON/The Daily Sentinel—From left, Jedediah Tatom, 3, Anthony Tatom, 5, and Charles Tatom, 4, brothers from Grand Junction, share one of the Main Street pianos.

Four upright pianos are on Main Street. Find them, and you can play to your heart’s content; no strings attached. Except, of course, for the strings attached to the piano.

The Grand Junction Symphony Orchestra has created the first Keys to the City: Street Piano Project in downtown Grand Junction, where people of all ages can channel their inner musician regardless of age or talent.

The idea from symphony Executive Director Kelly Anderson is modeled after similar projects in some of the world’s largest cities. The concept also appeared during the premiere episode of the third season of hit TV show, “Glee.”

The pianos — two donated and two purchased with a Grand Junction Commission on Arts & Culture grant — are scattered along Main Street.

They will be outside until May 19, including this upcoming weekend during the annual Art & Jazz Festival.

The concept is new to Grand Junction, but Anderson wants to see it grow to the point where the pianos are located throughout the city and painted vibrant colors by local artists or schoolchildren, said symphony spokesman Jeremy Herigstad.

There’s no cost to play. In fact, Herigstad heard a story this weekend about a man who sat down and played an impromptu concert Friday by Main Street Bagels.

That, Herigstad said, is the spirit of the project.

The pianos are located in front of Wells Fargo Bank, 359 Main St., near the clock by Page Parsons Jewelers, 444 Main St., outside Main Street Bagels, 559 Main St., and by the Avalon Theatre, 645 Main St.

Several formal shows connected to Keys To The City are planned:

■ 7 p.m. May 15

■ 7 p.m. May 17

■ 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 2 to 4 p.m. May 18, featuring local piano students

■ 7 p.m. May 18

More specific details about the events will be released closer to the actual date via the symphony’s Facebook page and published in Out & About.



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