Telemark skier mag brings movie to GJ

This jump photo was taken from “Let’s Go!” a movie from Telemark Skier Magazine that will be shown at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, at Summit Canyon Mountaineering, 461 Main St.



100512oaTelemarkMovie1

This jump photo was taken from “Let’s Go!” a movie from Telemark Skier Magazine that will be shown at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, at Summit Canyon Mountaineering, 461 Main St.

“Let’s Go!” a telemark movie, shows skiing in Alaska, Norway, Sweden, Colorado and Utah.



100512oaTelemarkMovie2

“Let’s Go!” a telemark movie, shows skiing in Alaska, Norway, Sweden, Colorado and Utah.

In an effort to get telemark skiers ready for ski season while simultaneously introducing people to the sport, Telemark Skier Magazine is stopping in Grand Junction during its annual tour to promote its new movie, “Let’s Go!”

The film about the Telemark Skier Crew and their search for fresh powder will be shown at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, at Summit Canyon Mountaineering, 461 Main St.

Cost is $5 for all ages.

Check out the movie trailer at vimeo.com/47921811.

Josh Madsen, owner and publisher of Telemark Skier Magazine, talked in a recent interview about the making of the movie last winter, why he loves telemark and the top places to tele in Colorado.

Melinda Mawdsley: Tell me about the making of this movie.

Josh Madsen: This is the fourth one we’ve done for Telemark Skier. We went to Alaska, Norway, Sweden, then around the West Coast — Colorado and Utah. It’s always really small. We have such a small budget. Usually, we are hiking for our turns. Usually, our group is about 11 people total, and our trips are usually broken down. Alaska was six guys total. Telemark is such a small, niche sport but there are so many passionate people.

Mawdsley: Much has been made of the lack of snowfall last year in this state. Did you guys run into issues trying to find fresh powder to make your film?

Madsen: Everywhere. The funny thing is you try to plan out these trips and block out time to go to a certain place (when they would have snow.) Even when we tried to chase the snow, we’d end up in a place with no snow. Then, we’d leave, and it would snow. ... After the Norway trip, we found some good snow in Utah. The Alaska crew was the crew that got the goods. They went up there in early April.

Mawdsley: Where did they go?

Madsen: They were up in an area called Hatcher Pass.

Mawdsley: Why do you like to telemark ski? Personally, it looks like a lot of work.

Madsen: I’ve always said the people who telemark ski are looking for the greatest challenge out there and also the best reward. I know it is that way for me. This is my 20th year of only telemark skiing. I’ve been doing this since I was like 14 years old. I don’t think telemark skiing is for everyone, but for those who want to put a little work into it, the reward is that much better. It’s like anything in life.

Mawdsley: Where should a person interested in tele skiing begin?

Madsen: Find your local shop. You can check us out online, telemarkskier.com. Find someone at your local hill. Powderhorn is there, and I know for a fact they’ve done a telemark festival. Just get involved. I think that’s the cool part of telemark. There’s a lot of camaraderie.

Mawdsley: Where are the top places in Colorado to tele ski?

Madsen: Anywhere that gets snow. It’s the classic question. People tend to have the impression that it’s backcountry skiing, and that’s not always the case. It’s more about making the turn than hiking up a hill. When you go back to Norway, the history of telemark skiing is jumping off stuff. It wasn’t about hiking.



COMMENTS

Commenting is not available in this channel entry.




Search More Jobs






THE DAILY SENTINEL
734 S. Seventh St.
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-242-5050
Editions
Subscribe to print edition
E-edition
Advertisers
Sign in to your account
Information

© 2014 Grand Junction Media, Inc.
By using this site you agree to the Visitor Agreement and the Privacy Policy