9/11 inspired man to move to GJ

Photo by Gretel Daugherty—Former Floridian Joseph Breman is living his dream with his wife, Jill, and their foxtrotter Lancer in Grand Junction, a move that was inspired by his experiences of living through 9/11 while on a business trip to New York City.



joe breman 9-11 por 090911

Photo by Gretel Daugherty—Former Floridian Joseph Breman is living his dream with his wife, Jill, and their foxtrotter Lancer in Grand Junction, a move that was inspired by his experiences of living through 9/11 while on a business trip to New York City.

Too many sources of terror remain untouched by the efforts of the United States and others, said a Grand Junction man who moved to western Colorado as a result of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

“Since that event, the world has not been together in unanimity to eliminate acts of terrorism,” Joseph Breman, the major gifts officer for the American associates of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel.

Russia and China still “coddle the sources of terror, and in that respect, nothing has changed,” Breman said.

Breman was in New York City on the morning of the attack and was among those who had to make their way by foot to safety.

“I remember seeing what happened. I remember my nose smelling what happened,” Breman said. “That odor is something I’ll never be able to get out of my nostrils.”

Once he was able to make his way home to Florida, he asked his wife where she would want to live in the event he were to be caught up in another attack. They had previously visited Grand Junction for a bar mitzvah and were smitten. They opted to move to western Colorado soon after.

It served a double purpose for Breman, who said he could live out a youthful dream.

“I always wanted to live in the West and around horses,” he said. “Now I’m 66, and I still want to be a cowboy.”

Today, the nation remains vulnerable to attack because the forces of evil behind the attacks haven’t been destroyed, Breman said.

“Evil doesn’t know religion, race, age or gender,” he said. “Everyone is a target.”

The outpouring of patriotic displays that followed 9/11 has faltered over the years, which is normal enough, Breman said.

Still, “I don’t think enough people appreciate the country they live in,” he said. “When I hear ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ today, it means a helluva lot more to me than it did on Sept. 10, 2001.”



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