Email Letters: April 4, 2017

Regent Gallegos should divest CU’s endowment from fossil fuel industry

Students, faculty, and alumni at the University of Colorado have been asking the Board of Regents to divest CU’s endowment from the fossil fuel industry since 2012. Peer institutions like the University of Massachusetts have already taken measures to protect their students from a future of climate disaster, and it is time for CU to follow suit. On several occasions, Regent Glen Gallegos has refused to engage in dialogue about the need for CU to take action against the climate crisis and its perpetrators: fossil fuel billionaires.

Gallegos’ 2012 campaign was based on serving students in western Colorado – making sure that a CU education was accessible to the entire state, not just the Front Range. A former educator himself, Gallegos has stood at the side of students throughout his life. His history of doing the right thing should be celebrated. In order to maintain this positive reputation, he must stand with students to face the largest crisis of our generation.

There is no more time for inaction. The Trump Administration has gutted the EPA, and fossil fuel CEOs are exploiting their free rein in our government. Every project the industry puts forth is nearly guaranteed to be fast-tracked, regardless of its impact on communities, the potential of disaster, and the lack of benefit to local economies. Regent Gallegos can do the right thing for CU students and the West Slope by cutting CU’s ties to an industry that works solely with the interests of the wealthy in mind. This is a matter of legacy – how does Gallegos want to be remembered, and whose side is he on?

NICK STUBLER
Grand Junction

Online tag renewal is both simple and efficient

More than 600 people waited in line recently to simply renew their tags and grumped most of that time I am sure. A $5 tag fee, which was intended to encourage people to renew online, was rejected as well.

At one time we were a part of the frustrating wait times because we refused to even consider online services. We changed our tune on that and would hope those who continue to stand in long lines to do such a simple thing, will rethink as well. We realize not everyone has a computer, but probably many of these individuals do and use it for many other things. It takes less than five minutes to go online, renew, and for an additional $2 fee, get it over and done with. If you have multiples you can also do them at the same time. Most of the time we have our tags mailed to us within two to three days.

It’s such an easy and simple thing to do but it is hard to get people to change even if it will make life easier. Hopefully these long lines will eventually send some people to the internet and “get it done” the easy way!
BEVERLY DUZENACK
Mesa

Euthanasia isn’t really about medical aid for the dying

Regarding a recent letter from Susan Cushman, I would like to disagree with her blaming Judge Gorsuch for his “inflexible view on medical aid in dying”; i.e. assisted suicide/euthanasia. It really isn’t at all about “medical aid for the dying” – this is just another way of twisting word definitions to suit one’s choice. There are many others these days.

Isn’t it interesting that our area has one of the highest suicide rates in the nation? Obviously, anyone who wants/needs to end their life can do so – without Judge Gorsuch’s agreement. This euthanasia idea is just the other end of the abortion spectrum – ending human lives. This is also just another attack on the conservative administration by the liberals who only want things their way.

CAROL ANDERSON
Collbran

Illegal phone use while driving should carry mandatory jail sentence

Almost any day, any of us driving the streets here in Grand Junction can see other drivers beside us, while driving or parked for a light, using their phones for talking or texting. Statistics now show that drivers not paying attention to where they are going cause a large percentage of collisions.

Obviously, many people do not take seriously the law that makes using your phone while driving illegal. I believe if it were known that if you get caught driving while texting or using your phone, there was a mandatory minimum jail sentence, and if the judges would enforce such a law, many lives would be saved, and there would be far fewer injuries and wrecks. Even if it were just a mandatory minimum of five days, word would get around, and we would all be safer.

STEVE CLINE
Grand Junction

DUIs serve to refill our coffers and replenish community service labor pool

Sarah Longwell’s article in last Sunday’s editorial section was well stated. I agree 100 percent with her; lowering the BAC limit to 0.05 from 0.08 is about more revenue in Utah’s coffers. It certainly isn’t for “safety” reasons.

The other purpose for issuing DUI’s rarely or never mentioned are the hours of “community service” that each person must perform if found guilty of a DUI or other minor criminal offenses. Community service is really a cleaned-up version of the word servitude or bondage. Described in the dictionary, servitude is “compulsory service or labor as a punishment for criminals; and slavery or bondage of any kind.”

Hundreds of community service workers in the Grand Valley are assigned to our hospitals, nursing homes, and not-for profit businesses every single day. They work in their laundries, kitchens, perform ground maintenance, and other menial tasks without pay. Each facility is guaranteed a certain number of community workers on a daily basis, allowing these facilities to operate without having to put the required number of workers on their payrolls.

For every community worker, there is one less full-time employee who would be contributing to our economy. When the pool is running low it’s round-up time for our local authorities: to re-fill our coffers and replenish the community service labor pool.

I hope Colorado has enough common sense not to follow Utah and lower the BAC down to 0.05. It’s frightful enough at 0.08, when going out in the evening for dinner, have a glass of wine maybe to celebrate an anniversary or to enjoy a social event and seeing that blue/red/white flash of light in your rearview mirror on your way home.

JUDITH CHAPIN
Fruita


COMMENTS

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Ms. Anderson, your statement;This is also just another attack on the conservative administration by the liberals who only want things their way.” How ironic! Conservatives, and religious conservatives such as yourself, have been constantly trying to interfere in the lives of others, from trying to dictate what a woman does with her own body and now to what a person decides relative to how they want to die. My guess is that you probably think there is a religious reason for thinking that ones body does not belong to themselves but to some make-believe deity. You are free to handle abortion and death for yourself but what part of mind your own business do you not understand? You can obey your deity but trying to foist it on others is off-limits. Are you familiar with this country’s constitution?

Steve,
The Colorado law for driving and cell phones is that you can’t text, update status, etc.  there is no law on the books in Colorado, save for operators of commercial motor vehicles in regards to not talking and driving.

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