Email letters, Dec. 5, 2012

Turn slippery debt slopes into safe steps for economy

We must use both reduced spending cuts and enhanced governmental revenues to reach our goals of fiscal solvency and a steadily recovering productive economy for the future. Let us turn the slippery slopes of debt into a series of safe steps to a healthy economy by:
1. encouraging all politicians to vote to take a pay and benefits cuts as an inspirational example to the nation.
2. leveling the playing field. We can save more than $6 billion each election if we publicly finance and fairly run elections in which each candidate receives exactly the same amount of resources such as money, media time, advertising, public discussion and debates. Even if you buy the argument that money spent on a campaign enables free speech, is it really fair that the wealthy get more speech?
3. motivating the wealthy to accept their fair share of their patriotic duty to end all loopholes and allow all favored tax breaks to expire. This was the central question answered by Obama’s re-election.
4. cutting all bloated military expenditures. Currently the U.S. is spending yearly about $800 billion on the military. That’s about five times as much as second-place China and 10 times as much as third-place Russia. The U.S. military spending equals the totals of China, Russia and the next 15 countries combined, without even including the trillions of dollars of war costs each for Iraq and Afghanistan.

Currently we monopolize almost 70 percent of the global arms trade. We maintain a massive military global presence, deploying more than 300,000 troops abroad occupying over 560 bases in more than half of the 193 countries in the world.

Since Vietnam, perpetual war has become central to American character, but now Obama is getting us out. Mike Mullen, past chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says, “The biggest threat we have to our national security is our debt.” Less money for war translates into more social investment to rebuild the health and infrastructure of our nation, so once again we can lead our world toward peace and prosperity.

LANCE OSWALD
Grand Junction

Democrats embarrassed to show support for president

In Monday’s front-page article, “Outnumbered 3 to 1, county Dems can count on minority status,” Martelle Daniels tried to make the point that Democrats here are reticent to show their support for President Obama because they are in the minority. Daniels is right about their minority status in Happy Valley, but she is wrong about why Democrats hid their support for Obama.

The reason true-blue Democrats hid their support was because of their embarrassment regarding their candidate. I have to admit I’d be embarrassed if my candidate had said, as Obama has:
    -that he had been in all 57 states.
    -that he didn’t care how high gasoline prices went.
    -corpse-man instead of corpsman.
    -that on May 4 he wished Hispanics happy “cinco de cuatro”, or happy 5 of 4.
    -that he doesn’t understand the Austrian language. Apparently, Obama doesn’t know that there is no such language.
    -that after the election he would have more “flexibility” in giving in to Russian demands on missile defenses.
    -that the deaths of four U.S. citizens in Benghazi was “not optimal” and were “bumps in the road.”
 
In short, embarrassed Democrats didn’t want to publicly show their support for Obama. However, since they could vote in private, casting a vote for a buffoon was OK, since no one would know they did.

RICK L. COLEMAN
Grand Junction
 
Monument Ridge tenants left in the dark about armed man

It has been made common knowledge that there was a shot fired at the Monument Ridge townhomes in Orchard Mesa on the night of Dec. 3. Being a cautious tenant, I approached the police two hours after the incident to inquire about what had happened. The police officer advised me that it was “nothing” and they had taken care of it.

I was denied the information that there was an armed man who was proven to be violent on the loose. Families such as mine were not made aware that there could have been a criminal taking cover around our homes. The shooter could have easily found a safe haven in one of these vacant garages. It was left up to the tenants of these apartments to discover on their own the terrifying news of a shooter on the loose.

Personally, I am furious with the Grand Junction Police Department for refusing to inform me that everything had in fact not been taken care of.

LILY WHITE
Grand Junction

Unfortunate Kansas City deaths inappropriate topic for Bob Costas

The murder/suicide of the football player and the mother of his child in Kansas City revved up the gun control crowd again. That incident, sad and tragic, will no doubt affect the lives of many. It’s the same with every needless death and always evokes the same “gun control” speech from liberals. We’ve heard it so many times that we know it by heart.

T.V. sports announcer Bob Costas, the most recent gun control advocate, took the opportunity Monday night to preach to us about that very subject. This controversial, debatable issue was aired nationally during a program intended to entertain. Being political and one man’s opinion, its mention at that time and place was wholly inappropriate.

He even implied that the player and his girlfriend would probably still be alive if he hadn’t had a gun, and he spoke as if the man was mentally normal before this incident and only did what he did because of the gun. He went on to suggest that because of that, none of us should be allowed to have guns. That kind of naive, simplistic talk is typical since we all know that to outlaw guns would merely shift gun crimes to other weapons, cripple gun-selling businesses and turn millions into lawbreakers overnight.

I suspect that young man was so troubled and inclined to do what he did that he would have found a way even without a gun. It’s just unfortunate he took another life with his own.

There’s no denying the Second Amendment is a “hot button” issue for the libs. There’s also no denying they’ll use any means necessary to ban guns and call it justified. In fact, there was talk last summer of a treaty of sorts, “the limitation of small arms sales to foreign countries,” I believe.

Some think it’s the backdoor to gun control in this country, and they may be right since Congress has repeatedly refused to enact such a proposal in the past. It stands to reason that a treaty bypassing Congress but accomplishing the goal would be proposed by this bunch.

I’m afraid this latest gun death and the publicity only encourage them more. But, however tragic, I don’t believe the death of one person is reason enough to penalize us all.

AL CARLEY
Grand Junction

U.S. must investigate potential of oil shale commercialization

I read with interest the stories over the last few days about a bill being advanced by Congressman Ralph Hall (R-Texas) to fund research for oil shale.

Considering the recent press involving oil shale, this bill makes a lot of sense. Much has been said about how certain groups are uneasy with oil shale commercialization, despite the tremendous amount of energy that could be tapped, because they feel there has not been enough research done yet.

If that is the case, it is incumbent upon the federal government, which owns most of the land above this enormous oil reserve, to invest in that research, and answer the questions that may still exist.

If we as a nation are truly committed to an all-of-the-above energy plan, then we need to research all the energy sources at our disposal. America’s oil shale resources are larger by far than any other oil field in the world, including the Middle East. It only makes sense that we would do our best as a nation to find out how best to produce this resource and wean ourselves off foreign sources of it.

We have a president who has repeatedly indicated that he is willing to spend taxpayers’ money on investments in “green” energy, such as wind and solar. Since he won the election, we have no reason to believe that he will not do just that. But if those investments in solar and wind are going to be made, then similar investments need to be made in other forms of energy, as well, especially ones that are more likely to actually provide usable energy and a return on investment, such as oil shale.

JANET BLACKMAN

Grand Junction



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