Email letters, February 1, 2013

Vanquish drug addiction to reduce gun violence

It makes sense to me that an armed assault requires an armed response.

Every single act of violence named by Sen. Udall, beginning with Columbine and ending with the shooting at Newtown, Conn., that he says “we can all agree ... are national tragedies that should concern us all,” required an armed response.

The lag time between the first shot fired by a murderer and the arrival of armed police costs lives. Or it allows more people to be shot. If a business has a policy that does not allow a law-abiding citizen to carry either open-carry or concealed in compliance with our Second Amendment rights, then a rational policy would be that law-abiding citizens deserve the same rights as any rich Democratic Party politician.

Every school shooting since Columbine involved criminals who violated the law (stolen guns) or who were under the influence of prescribed drugs (or suffering delirium tremens—withdrawal).

More gun laws will only make it easier for crime to be committed, until we get a handle on the national sin of drug addiction (anti-depressants or anti-psychotic drugs that do not cure anything but do lead to such violent acts as seen since Columbine).

Too bad the Democrats are so stupid.

ROBERT JAMES BURKHOLDER
Fruita

Public schools also produce high-achieving students on current schedules

I find it interesting that a staff member of the Sentinel preceded my letter about the need for the school calendar not to be changed this year with a letter expressing an opposing view.

As a parent and teacher, I was offended by the insinuation that the “coveted” charter schools should be a prime factor in drastically changing thousands of schedules.

All of our public schools may not be so “coveted,” but many also produce extremely talented and capable students. I teach in what I consider a “coveted” public school, and I consider all of my students to be just as capable, talented and intelligent as any charter school student.

Yes, change can be scary, but it also needs to be approached in a sensible way. District 51 students, teachers, staff and parents have been bombarded with changes that may not be necessarily the way to go.

I am truly sorry that Jennifer Schmaltz thinks her daughter loses knowledge over the summer. It isn’t knowledge that she may be losing; it’s that transfer of the skill using that knowledge.

As a teacher, I know that no matter how long students have been out of school on break, they all did those skills revisited and addressed. I don’t think anyone is running away and screaming from this proposal. I think that most people are just unaware.

The meetings were announced rather quickly, and most parents are still unaware of the proposals. Maybe, it would behoove reporters to have these proposals published in the newspaper for parents to be informed.

Also, teachers received a few different proposals for calendars than those that are actually being presented, so I feel that it would benefit everyone involved by reviewing the options more carefully.

Change doesn’t necessarily have to be scary, but possibly approached from a better sense of understanding and research rather than diving in because a few think it’s the best thing to do to improve learning in the district.

JACKIE ROSS
Grand Junction

Mentally ill shooters view schools as ‘soft targets’

This analogy by an unknown author may help you understand the thought process for people against guns.

“Gun control is like trying to reduce drunk driving by making it tougher for sober people to own cars.

“In the end, this is not about gun control but rather about neutering the population. As I’ve said before, nothing being proposed will make our children or our people one bit safer.”

In my opinion, the mentally ill look for soft targets, kill as many humans as possible and then take their own lives. An unprotected school without armed security is a perfect target.

We need to protect our children now and not wait for ultimate solutions. We need to start immediately putting armed security in schools.

Don’t let some political jerk talk you into approving options that doesn’t make any sense and more importantly, ones that leave our children unprotected. 

WILLIAM F. MCKNIGHT
Grand Junction

Patience is liberals’ strong suit

The “gun control” debate is as old as the American Revolution itself. But, like many liberal ideas, its tenets defy common sense. However, the liberals are a patient bunch. They’ve lain quietly, waiting for the catalyst to inflame opinion so as to inch their “gun grab” agenda forward.

Looking back as recently as Reagan and Brady, they tried to promote a robust gun-control policy, but attitudes and congressional chemistry back then prevented major traction.

So, they settled for small gains. But remember, patience is their strong suit, so more recently the Gifford tragedy in Tucson afforded the libs another opportunity to “push,” but again, little traction. Then, the [ITAL] coup de grace[ITAL]:  back-to-back shootings at Aurora and Newtown.

Now, the time is right, a liberal president combined with a liberal Senate, a grieving, propagandized public and a high-profile enemy called the NRA.

While Feinstein-style gun bans might work in California, they’re too big a pill to swallow for the whole country, so here’s where the “baby step” approach comes in. The latest executive orders, which when implemented will not prevent another Newtown or Aurora tragedy, will, however, bring about one more small gain on the long road to total gun control.

Even though far-reaching legislation this year is unlikely, it’s sure to result in the banning of something.

Never mind what. What’s important is that the citizens will have relinquished one more freedom and liberals will have moved the issue forward a little more. Gradual gains work for the patient liberals every time.

And again, we’ll just stand by and watch it happen,

AL CARLEY
Grand Junction

Americans’ rights distinguish country from rest of world

Article the first [Not Ratified]

After the first enumeration required by the first article of the Constitution, there shall be one Representative for every thirty thousand, until the number shall amount to one hundred, after which the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall be not less than one hundred Representatives, nor less than one Representative for every forty thousand persons, until the number of Representatives shall amount to two hundred; after which the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall not be less than two hundred Representatives, nor more than one Representative for every fifty thousand persons.

Article the second [Amendment XXVII - Ratified 1992]

No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.

Article the third [Amendment I]

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Article the fourth [Amendment II][4]

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

***

If we’re going to get rid of the Second Amendment, let’s start with the first one on the Bill of Rights and work our way down. That way we won’t miss any of the rights we have as Americans. These rights are what separate us from the rest of the world.

If you don’t support your rights as an American, then move to another country that supports gun control and controls its people.

CURT CLAUSSEN

Grand Junction

Catching a lucky break on appearance of weapons

While I was watching the dog-and-pony show on gun control run by Democrats, it occurred to me how incredibly lucky I am.  Others and I could have suffered a catastrophe except for the most minor of details that prevented me from owning an assault rifle.

At age 15 I received a Remington Nylon 66 semi-automatic rifle capable of spitting out 16 rounds as fast as I could pull the trigger.  Later in life I bought a M1 carbine that accepts 30-round magazines and fires as fast as the trigger is pulled.  The M1 was used by our troops to assault the beaches of Normandy, Iwo Jima and Okinawa and in all sorts of action in Korea.  It was even used in Vietnam.  In short, it was a very important tool for our troops for a long time.

So, why am I so lucky?  Well, neither of those guns is black and neither has a pistol grip, I shudder to think what could have happened had that not been the case.  Now I sleep better knowing those guns in the safe are not “assault” rifles simply because of how they look.

I am constantly amazed at the buffoons in Washington and the circus over which they preside.

RICK L. COLEMAN

Grand Junction

As gun debate continues, teachers could bar doors

The gun-control discussions will be taking place for years to come.
In the meantime, we need to take measures for more security in schools.

My suggestion is to immediately have every school door easily secured from the inside as soon as the students are in the classroom. A bar that the teacher could easily flip into place would give the students, parents and teachers some peace of mind while all other suggestions are being debated.

VIRGINIA LIONBERGER

Grand Junction

Leftist environmental groups block vital energy development

I am sick of the leftist environmental groups trying to block the production of oil, natural gas and coal. Do these people not heat their houses and fill their cars with gas?

They support the wind and solar industries with enthusiasm, although we have yet to reap any benefits from those industries. They want to deny this nation cheap energy, a booming economy and independence from Middle East oil.

Am I to conclude they have secure jobs and are willing to ride bicycles and live in unheated houses?

It is time for our leaders to stop giving into their demands and the courts to start throwing out their frivolous lawsuits designed solely to cost energy suppliers untold millions.

Not all of us wish this country ill, as to the environmental groupies who bought into Al Gore’s global warming hoax.

BERTIE MARAH

Cedaredge



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