Evidence for man-made global warming is rapidly melting

The mountains of so-called evidence for the theory of global warming are fast being reduced to molehills.

If trends continue, they won’t even last too long as molehills.

Just last week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the Olympus of the Church of Global Warmists, acknowledged that one of its tenets was founded on a fraud.

And it wasn’t just any tenet, either.

The belief was that the glaciers of the Himalayas would disappear by 2035 because of the Earth’s rapid heating.

It was particularly persuasive because it wasn’t some extrapolation based on a model that was itself dependent on variables that were, at best, mere guesses.

The idea that the Himalayan glaciers were shriveling like ice cubes under a heat lamp in July didn’t require believers to buy into the abstract notion that carbon dioxide was the burning bed of the planet.

Shrinking glaciers were tangible. Their retreat could be measured and observed.

Except for the fact it couldn’t be.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last week reversed its longstanding course and said that its much-touted claims of the retreating glaciers of the Himalayas amounted to so much yakwash.

Of course the august panel didn’t phrase it quite that way.

The IPCC dove for cover in the weed patch of bureaucratese and said “the clear and well-established standards of evidence, required by the IPCC procedure, were not applied properly.”

If that sort of sounds like the same thing President Obama said about Martha Coakley losing Ted Kennedy’s seat in the U.S. Senate, well, duh.

Critics of the IPCC have been saying for some time that the glacier story was a whitewash, but they were ignored and smeared as mere “deniers.”

The fact is, though, that the collapse of the Himalayan glacier fantasy is only the most recent in a string of false beliefs to be stripped bare.

Late last year, the e-mails of the Climate Research Unit at East Anglia University revealed the researchers to be more interested in conducting search-and-destroy missions against skeptics than conducting real research, more interested in hiding declines than shoring up evidence.

Then it was brought out — once again — that the so-called connection between global warming and the shrinking snows of Kilimanjaro couldn’t hold up because the mountain’s icy tip has been shrinking since the 1890s.

Next, the original data used to base the idea of a world warming as a result of the industrial revolution turned up missing. Original data is an absolute necessity for true peer-review and its absence at a most inconvenient moment — some would say quite convenient monent — did little to shore up faith in the belief system.

Sort of like the 2009 Denver Broncos defense, what looked like a brick wall turned into tissue paper ready to be shredded by a soft nudge.

The United Nations is catching on. A deadline for nations to announce emissions-reduction data is no longer.

Even Congress is starting to question the dogma. Cap-and-trade legislation might be off the table, ostensibly because of the loss of Massachusetts to the heretics, but perhaps there is more to it.

About the only place at which the news has yet to arrive is downtown Denver, specifically a certain hilltop near downtown.

The day might someday come that Gov. Bill Ritter will wake up to the smell of the ancient global-warming incense and comment that it smells a lot like the stuff he grew up around as a farm kid.

Only then will the Colorado, and the rest of the world, figure out how to deal with energy and its economy.


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