Printed letters, July 17, 2013

The idea that the Avalon Theatre only serves an elite few is simply wrong. In 2012 the Avalon hosted 433 events, and more than 65,000 patrons crossed the threshold to watch movies, kids’ dance recitals, church services, live concerts, film festivals, choral concerts and other live arts performances that catered to a wide-ranging audience of all ages and economic backgrounds.

More than 15 performing arts organizations use the Avalon on a regular basis, as well as multiple concert promoters and a church. When the theater is not otherwise in use, the city shows movies for $5. Every Tuesday night, a movie is free for those that eat dinner in a downtown restaurant, thereby creating an affordable night out for everyone. The Avalon Theatre is truly the cornerstone of commerce and culture in our community.

People come from all over the Western Slope to Grand Junction to shop, attend games at Stoc¡ker Stadium, use our hospitals and our airport, attend CMU and go to the Avalon. The Avalon fills a need not filled elsewhere as the largest civic theater between Denver and Salt Lake City. It is an economic driver for our restaurants, shops and hotels.

We would like to thank the City Council for understanding how important the Avalon is in reaching the city’s goal of becoming the most livable community west of the Rockies by 2025 and moving forward with construction of Phase I.

An improved and expanded Avalon Theatre brings us one step closer to attracting increased tourism opportunities, new businesses and young families to our community.

We invite the entire community to come celebrate with us at our groundbreaking ceremony at 4 p.m. July 25 at the Avalon Theatre.

KATHY HALL

KAREN HILDEBRANDT

Co-chairs

Avalon Cornerstone Project

Colorado should examine how
other states fund their schools

Gov. John Hickenlooper and the Colorado Legislature tout Senate Bill 213, the Future School Finance Act, and the ballot measure to raise taxes for schools as a national model.

A lot of other states use their lottery, Powerball and Mega Millions earnings for schools, instead of giving it to rich people so they can still keep their property and continue to make a profit off it. That benefits a few while the many might have their taxes raised.

Maybe the state of Colorado could learn a lesson from these other states.

TOM GAHAGAN

Grand Junction

 

Equal application of law 
to all citizens no longer true

The USA was created as a nation of laws, under the rule of law. Laws were to apply equally to all citizens. That is no longer true.

 For decades our senators and representatives have exempted themselves from some of the laws under which the rest of us must live. A recent example is the so-called Affordable Care Act (health care bill), which does not apply to them, their aides or their families.

 We now have a government that unabashedly writes and enforces laws with exclusions, exceptions, exemptions and incentives for favored groups. The act gave some states, companies and organizations financial incentives to support it. Some large companies and unions asked for exemptions from the act and received them.

 In 2014 employers with 50 full-time employees are mandated to offer them health care or pay fines. Now the administration has arbitrarily delayed that a year, until after mid-term elections when employers could have been a strong force against them.

 However, the individual mandate remains in effect. With employers now having no incentive to cover employees, more employees will have to join “exchanges,” which is what the Obamacrats wanted anyway — a government-run health care system and the demise of the employer-based system.

 Our government’s main function now seems to be increasing its power by creating laws that reward some people and make more people more dependent on government. It will continue unless we stop it. How far must it go before you become politically active?

ANGIE MANY

Eckert

 

Great American dream 
offered only to foreigners

According to Sen. Michael Bennet in his opinion piece in a recent Denver Post, the American dream is only for foreigners.

His bill, which the Senate passed in June, would dramatically inhibit ordinary Americans in achieving their dreams. By doubling legal immigration, which already causes most population growth, he would forgo Americans’ dream of stabilizing our population for generations, thus exacerbating our environmental challenges.

By increasing guest workers and low-skill immigration, he will assure that entire classes of jobs will not pay the wages or offer the dignity that citizens expect.

By vastly increasing skilled immigration, he will lower the return citizens will receive for graduating from college and maintaining the civil society that is the basis of U.S. prosperity.

He also tells foreigners that they have no hope of succeeding in their homelands and assures that they won’t by imperially extracting their smartest and most motivated. Tell Congress to reject Senate Bill 744.

PETER O’NEILL

Fort Collins



COMMENTS

Commenting is not available in this channel entry.




Search More Jobs






THE DAILY SENTINEL
734 S. Seventh St.
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-242-5050
Editions
Subscribe to print edition
E-edition
Advertisers
Sign in to your account
Information

© 2014 Grand Junction Media, Inc.
By using this site you agree to the Visitor Agreement and the Privacy Policy