Printed letters, Jan. 26, 2010

U.S. works for peace, terrorists spread hate

While the kind, generous people of the United States of America give so much to the world, the terrorists of Islamic faith continue their hateful ways. While the United States tried to establish peace, so we may develop infrastructure, like schools, hospitals and clean water for the people of the Mideast, their ideology urges the terrorists to create bombs to kill the women and children.

While we expend our fortunes and lives to provide a better way for their countries, they wreak havoc on their own.

Many of the wealthiest Arabs give more attention and financing to terrorists than to their own countrymen. Their contributions are historically miserly when helping alleviate disasters like Haiti. There would be a less hateful and dangerous place if their most valued possessions were still tents, goats and camels.

Greedily hoarded oil revenues by a few Arabs while so many of their people live in poverty points to the terroristic, uncivilized image so many of them present to our world.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if instead of having to expend American lives and resources to fight barbarians who relish in blowing up women and children the terrorists would use their efforts to develop a better way of life in places like Haiti and throughout the world?

CLARENCE ROST

Science and religion are not mutually exclusive

In the Jan. 21 edition of The Daily Sentinel, there appeared two letters on the topic of science and religion. It was good to note that they both were concerned with science and religion and not the usual extreme points of view which compete under the topic science versus religion.

I often wonder why the topic always takes on extreme points of view. It is usually free-thinking atheists versus faith-based theists.  What about all of us in the middle who are free-thinking theists?

As best we can tell, the universe was created out of nothing. Visit Einstein’s eloquently simple equation. Of course, there is a creator. Exit the city lights and look up at the star- and-galaxy filled sky. Magnificent is inadequate to describe it. Our world, our universe, is filled with wonders beyond our understanding: matter, life, intelligence, reflective thought, gravity, force, energy.

Of course there is a god. Even atheists must concede a description of this being in order to be critical of it. Someone once said, “I don’t believe in the god atheists don’t believe in either.”  The point here is that god is different to everyone, never the same. Beyond our ability to imagine let alone understand.

So what’s the problem? There is no problem with science and religion. They are complementary. A problem exists only when extremists try to impose their extreme and baseless ideas of truth on others.

ROBERT A. TALLARICO

 

Only God can judge the sins of others

The letter to the editor by Jodie Wright is unkind, self-righteous and blind to the issue of the suffering of innocents. There are no satisfactory answers to the problem, but it seems to me that our best response ought to be to help relieve the suffering, not to condemn the unfortunate.

Mortals have no way of weighing another’s sin and Ms. Wright exhibits extreme hubris in suggesting that she can read God’s mind.

Amos was involved in the covenant practice of self-criticism and his rhetoric excoriated the upper class. Amos condemned both Israel and Judah for social oppression. He was concerned with religious complacency, people who observe the rituals while ignoring the poor in their midst. He said: “Hear this word, you cows of Bashan ...who oppress the poor, who crush the needy, who say to their husbands: ‘Bring that we may drink ...’ “(Amos 4:1 ff.)

DALE C. STAPLETON

 

Haiti earthquake was a natural event

Jodie Wright’s letter in support of Pat Robertson’s absurd idea that what happened in Haiti is a result of some supposed pact with the devil made generations ago is scary.

It is hard to believe that in this day and age we have people who actually believe such nonsense. Earthquakes happen. It is not some punishment from God or the result of devil worship. They are a natural event that unfortunately can cause great suffering.

STEVEN MILLER



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