Printed letters, July 18, 2013

The Dominguez-Escalante National Conservation Area Draft Resource Management Plan holds a lot of future promise in its Preferred Alternative E for many different user groups: motorized, quiet trail users (mountain bikers, horse riders, hikers), history buffs, hunters, wildlife proponents, rock climbers, scientists and river boaters.

You need to look beyond the route maps. You need to look at the details of the document to see that Alternative E proposes recreation areas that will lead to the development of new high quality routes for each of these user groups.

If you look at the section on Cactus Park, you would see that the Preferred Alternative E proposes to build new, better routes before closing and rehabbing the redundant routes.

It is important to also remember that this is a national conservation area, not a national recreation area. Recreation definitely has a place within the D-E NCA, but it is not the only important aspect of the area. Wildlife needs space, too.

Grazing livestock must also continue to be part of the future of the D-E NCA. Protection of precious resources such as rare plants, fossils and rock art all also must be accommodated in the plan.

There are quite a few existing routes that were created by users who didn’t understand the dynamics of rain and erosion. Huge gullies in roads mean bypass roads have been created.

There is definitely room for improvement by building sustainable new routes and closing and rehabbing others.

Look for the whole document at BLM’s Grand Junction website, or stop by its office and ask for a CD.

But don’t just look at the maps; commit some effort to the task and read the document.

JANICE SHEPHERD

Grand Junction

Sky has not fallen after
passage of Amendment 64

People in this community are quick to demand individual freedom, wave the flag for their various causes and decry the government for telling them what they can’t do.

Seems ironic these patriots are also quick to dictate to other people with whom they disagree what they cannot do.

Too often it is assumed that everyone leans conservatively in the Grand Valley, but that is a misconception.

Since the passage of Amendment 64, I look around and see the sky has not fallen. Some people — enough to pass the amendment in the first place — see nothing wrong with consuming marijuana.

If treated the same as other drugs that are not too good for you (alcohol and tobacco), I don’t see why our city or county leaders have the right to prevent the sale of this now-legal product.

Many local citizens opposed Sunday liquor sales because Sunday is the Lord’s Day. But many religions consider days other than Sunday to be holy. Others celebrate and practice their religion every day.

Sunday liquor sales were finally allowed, and the sky did not fall.

The same argument can be made about abortion and same sex marriage. If you don’t want to do either, don’t. The sky remains firmly overhead.

Be careful not to declare majority rule at the expense of the rights of all. It’s a slippery slope to mob rule.

Oh, and please don’t respond with that tired old invective, “Love it or leave it.”

I have every bit as much right to live here as the next person. It’s a free country, isn’t it?

CHERYL CONROD

Grand Junction

 

President misuses power 
of his office on Obamacare

Obamacare is now “the law of the land.” It’s codified.

This monstrosity, thrust on most Americans against their will, will no doubt bring unintended consequences as yet undetermined. Its popularity has never been lower. Nonetheless, it is the law.

Just in time for Democrat incumbents to face less angry constituents during mid-term elections, a presidential decree delayed implementation of a certain part of the law.

What? How can a codified law be changed by presidential decree, or anyone?

A delay would benefit many small businesses, so they’re staying quiet. However, as this delay demonstrates, this law is and will continue to be impossible to implement.

Regardless, it is the law and should not be subject to the whims of one man.

It’s been said that we get the government we deserve. If ours was the only generation to suffer from this foolishness, then so be it.

Unfortunately, our massive national debt insures suffering for generations yet unborn.

AL CARLEY

Grand Junction

 

Columnist Grant must
now abide by own words

I am so relieved to read that Bill Grant now disapproves of folk using their resources to, in his words, “advance their own economic and ideological agendas.”

I am sure that in the future Grant’s opinion will be devoid of his previously held liberal economic and ideologically point of view. Or not.

JAMES WELCH

Montrose

And, now, the Tasty Bites theory of government. You might have heard that the House of Representatives has passed a farm bill.

For decades, Congress has merged food stamps with agricultural subsidies in one big, messy, bipartisan farm bill that made everybody happy.

Well, not euphoric. There was definitely that messy factor. But it did merge the interests/needs of urban and rural lawmakers, Democrats and Republicans.

Lately, the House has begun chopping up big, complicated bills into what Speaker John Boehner once described as “bite-sized chunks that members can digest.” So, the farm bill got divided. The two parts were not equally tidy.

As Ron Nixon reported in The Times, the rate of error and fraud in the agricultural crop insurance program is significantly higher than in the food stamp program.

Also, the agriculture part has a lot of eyebrow-raising provisions, such as the $147 million a year in reparations we send to Brazil to make up for the fact that it won a World Trade Organization complaint about the market-distorting effects of our cotton subsidies. And while food stamps go to poor people, most of the farm aid goes to wealthy corporations.

So, House Republicans passed the farm part and left food stamps hanging. Say what? Tea party conservatives have an all-purpose disdain for anything that smacks of redistribution of wealth, and food stamps are a prime target.

“The role of citizens, of Christians, of humanity, is to take care of each other. But not for Washington to steal money from those in the country and give to others in the country,” Rep. Stephen Fincher, R-Tenn., said in a speech in Memphis.

So, the food stamp program was the total opposite of a Tasty Bite to House Republicans. They rallied behind the just-farm-stuff bill in a party line 216-208 vote.

“This is a victory for farmers and conservatives who desired desperately needed reforms to these programs,” said Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., the majority leader.

The House bill actually spent more money on subsidies for farmers than the bipartisan Senate version the Republicans scorned. It also dropped the Senate’s limit on aid to farmers with incomes of more than $750,000 a year. And while it mimicked the Senate in dropping most of the much-derided direct payments to farmers, the House gave cotton farmers a two-year extension.

Let’s take a special look at cotton, which is a particularly good example of the tendency of agricultural benefits to flow uphill. “Some of these guys — and they’re all guys — are getting more than $1 million in support. The bottom 80 percent are getting $5,000 on average,” said Scott Faber of the Environmental Working Group.

Faber’s organization says direct payments to cotton farmers since 1995 have totaled $3.8 billion. That does not count the annual $147 million the U.S. is sending to Brazil in hush money.

Crop insurance gets bigger under the new plan. Here’s how: You, the taxpayer, fork over the majority of the cost of the farmers’ policy premiums. (Up to 80 percent in the case of cotton.)

Also, you spend about $1.3 billion a year to compensate the insurance agents for the fact that they have to sell coverage to any eligible farmer, whatever his prospects for success. Plus, if yields actually do drop, you have to compensate the insurance companies for part of the cost of claims.

The larding of benefits to farmers didn’t come up during the House debate. It was all about food stamps, and Democrats asking to know why their colleagues wanted to cut aid to hungry children and old people.

During an Agriculture Committee meeting on the bill, Rep. Juan Vargas, D-Calif., quoted Jesus: “Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”

That raised Fincher’s hackles. “Man, I really got bent out of shape,” he told that Memphis audience, proudly reporting that he countered with Thessalonians: “The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat.”

By now, you must wonder why I keep bringing up this guy. Fincher is a farmer who has, over the years, received $3.5 million in federal agricultural subsidies, much of it for — yes! — cotton.

The New York Times

 

 

The Dominguez-Escalante National Conservation Area Draft Resource Management Plan holds a lot of future promise in its Preferred Alternative E for many different user groups: motorized, quiet trail users (mountain bikers, horse riders, hikers), history buffs, hunters, wildlife proponents, rock climbers, scientists and river boaters.

You need to look beyond the route maps. You need to look at the details of the document to see that Alternative E

proposes recreation areas that will lead to the development of new high quality routes for each of these user groups.

If you look at the section on Cactus Park, you would see that the Preferred Alternative E proposes to build new, better routes before closing and rehabbing the redundant routes.

It is important to also remember that this is a national conservation area, not a national recreation area. Recreation definitely has a place within the D-E NCA but it is not the only important aspect of the area. Wildlife needs space, too. Grazing livestock must also continue to be part of the future of the D-E NCA. Protection of precious resources such as rare plants, fossils and rock art all also must be accommodated in the plan.

There are quite a few existing routes that were created by users who didn’t understand the dynamics of rain and erosion. Huge gullies in roads mean bypass roads have been created. There is definitely room for improvement by

building sustainable new routes and closing and rehabbing others.

Look for the whole document at BLM’s Grand Junction website, or stop by its office and ask for a CD. But don’t just look at the maps; commit some effort to the task and read the document.

 

JANICE SHEPHERD

Grand Junction

 

 

Sky has not fallen after

passage of Amendment 64

 

People in this community are quick to demand individual freedom, wave the flag for their various causes and decry the government for telling them what they can’t do. Seems ironic these patriots are also quick to dictate to other people with whom they disagree what they cannot do.

Too often it is assumed that everyone leans conservatively in the Grand Valley, but that is a misconception.

 

Since the passage of Amendment 64, I look around and see the sky has not fallen. Some people — enough to pass the amendment in the first place — see nothing wrong with consuming marijuana. If treated the same as other drugs that are not too good for you (alcohol and tobacco), I don’t see why our city or county leaders have the right to prevent the sale of this now-legal product.

Many local citizens opposed Sunday liquor sales because Sunday is the Lord’s Day. But many religions consider days other than Sunday to be holy. Others celebrate and practice their religion every day. Sunday liquor sales were finally allowed, and the sky did not fall.

The same argument can be made about abortion and same sex marriage. If you don’t want to do either, don’t. The sky remains firmly overhead.

Be careful not to declare majority rule at the expense of the rights of all. It’s a slippery slope to mob rule. Oh, and please don’t respond with that tired old invective, “Love it or leave it.” I have every bit as much right to live here as the next person. It’s a free country, isn’t it?

 

CHERYL CONROD

Grand Junction

 

 

President misuses power

of his office on Obamacare

 

Obamacare is now “the law of the land.” It’s codified. This monstrosity, thrust on most Americans against their will, will no doubt bring unintended consequences as yet undetermined. Its popularity has never been lower. Nonetheless, it is the law.

Just in time for Democrat incumbents to face less angry constituents during mid-term elections, a presidential decree delayed implementation of a certain part of the law. What? How can a codified law be changed by presidential decree, or anyone?

A delay would benefit many small businesses, so they’re staying quiet. However, as this delay demonstrates, this law is and will continue to be impossible to implement.

Regardless, it is the law and should not be subject to the whims of one man.

It’s been said that we get the government we deserve. If ours was the only generation to suffer from this foolishness, then so be it. Unfortunately, our massive national debt insures suffering for generations

yet unborn.

 

AL CARLEY

Grand Junction

 

 

Columnist Grant must

now abide by own words

 

I am so relieved to read that Bill Grant now disapproves of folk using their resources to, in his words, “advance their own economic and ideological agendas.”

I am sure that in the future Grant’s opinion will be devoid of his previously held liberal economic and ideologically point of view! Or not.

 

JAMES WELCH

Montrose



COMMENTS

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Dear Cheryl, I would hope everybody has the right to do exactly what the hell ever they want to do with who ever, as long as I have the right not to listen to them and keep my guns close. By the way, I worked in overhead cranes a good part of my adult life and I never wanted to hear how hard the guy up overhead swinging the load had partied the night before and how bad the hangover was. You may feel different, by all means go work with them but I still reserve the right not to. I support mandatory UA’s and felt safer when someone would pop positive and be sent home. I feel maybe operating a vehicle might be put under the same scrutiny that and Cell phone confiscation when abused while driving.

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