Are you on the hunt for a place to hunt?

In the Crosshairs

If owning a home in the country where you can hunt, fish or raise animals is a priority, this piece of property near Collbran might be for you. It includes a 1,672-square foot home that was remodeled in 2011, a stable, outbuildings and corral on more than 49 acres, 45 of which are irrigated. Julie Piland with United Country Real Estate is listing the property for $569,000.  courtesy photo



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If owning a home in the country where you can hunt, fish or raise animals is a priority, this piece of property near Collbran might be for you. It includes a 1,672-square foot home that was remodeled in 2011, a stable, outbuildings and corral on more than 49 acres, 45 of which are irrigated. Julie Piland with United Country Real Estate is listing the property for $569,000.  courtesy photo

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The hunting and recreational property market is all a matter of perspective. For some buyers, a suitable hunting property might be 50 acres of vacant land that allows them to pitch a tent or park an RV and also borders public land in a favorite game management unit (GMU). For others, it might be a multi-million dollar property with thousands of acres and a nice home that allows them to bring the entire family out to the property when they come to Colorado to hunt.
Both types of hunting properties exist in Mesa County, along with others that are somewhere in between the two extremes. This year, the mountain property market has been more active than in the last few years, but it hasn’t quite caught up to the residential market in the Grand Valley.
“There is lots of money available to qualified buyers who may be looking, but buyers are still on hold,” said Brian Mason with Mason Real Estate, who typically handles quite a few mountain and ranching properties, and currently has several high dollar properties on Glade Park. “They’re not sure about health care, worried about taxes. The economics haven’t loosened up for buyers looking at million dollar properties.”
While some buyers are only interested in properties that border a specific GMU that’s known for trophy hunting, others want to consistently pull a tag and are more interested in areas where licenses aren’t as difficult to obtain.
“Typically, most out-of-state buyers have been out here and hunted before,” said Julie PIland with United Country Real Estate. “They know the area, they’ve been here before; it’s been their dream to own property here.”
Piland currently has three properties that border public land, either national forest or BLM areas, which she said is somewhat unusual.
“Properties that border national forest land are usually hard to come by,” Piland said.
Piland estimated that about 60 percent of her hunting property buyers are from out of town, which she attributed to her firm’s presence in the national real estate market. She also gets calls from out-of-area owners who own property on Grand Mesa or the Uncompahgre and have decided they’re ready to sell.
“I’ve been the busiest I’ve ever been,” she said about this season’s real estate activity. “I’m constantly getting calls and scheduling showings.”
Although Piland also works in the Grand Valley, she has lived in Mesa for 12 years and has lots of community connections.
“The majority of my listings are in Collbran, Mesa and Molina,” she said, “it’s a small town. Everybody knows everybody.”
Because mountain properties with nearby hunting and recreation are so unique, it’s can be difficult to distinguish trends or even a standard length of time a property might stay on the market before it sells.
Linda Sparks with Bray Real Estate had three recreational properties available earlier in the season. One is in hunting area 61, which is a prime hunting unit off Divide Road on the Uncompahgre, while the other two were in a large-parcel subdivision near Debeque that backs up to BLM area. She had one of the Debeque properties listed for three years and the other for five months, and they both went under contract within two days of each other.
The vacant land in area 61, which has good road access as well as three springs with water rights, is still available.
To get the latest information about hunting in Colorado, go to the website on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife page, cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/BigGame.aspx, where you can click through to the big game or sheep and goat brochure or look for copies of the 2017 Colorado Hunter, a 140-page glossy magazine published jointly by Grand Junction Media (The Daily Sentinel and The Nickel), Craig Daily Press, Steamboat Pilot & Today, Glenwood Post Independent, Rifle Citizen Telegram, Summit Daily News and Sky-Hi News. Colorado Hunter is available at the Grand Junction Media building on S. Seventh, as well as as distribution racks in grocery stores and at the Visitor and Convention Bureau sites.





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