Mike Mason bio

Player: Mike Mason

Nickname: Mase

Position: Pitcher

Jersey Number: 38

School: Marshall University

Hometown: Maumee, Ohio

Height, Weight: 6-3, 205

Bats/Throws: Right/Left

Best Baseball Memory: Throwing a no-hitter in 10-year-old states.

Greatest Baseball Accomplishment: Being drafted.

Favorite Player Growing Up: Cliff Lee.

Most Influential Player/Role Model: My brother, because he coached me all through Little League.

Favorite Food: Pickles.

Favorite Pregame Meal: Subway.

Off-field hobbies: Golf, fishing, hunting.

Favorite Movie or Book: “Snatch.”

 

 

Anyone who looks at the numbers — 4-6 record, 4.15 ERA in 14 starts — won’t get the real picture of what Mike Mason’s senior season at Marshall University meant to him. He admits the statistics won’t impress anyone, but he believes he made strides that will help him in the pro ranks.

“Our pitching coach talked to us a lot about being able to pitch at the next level and realizing that these men with metal bats in college, you’re going to get beaten a couple times on pitches that you shouldn’t get beaten on,” Mason said. “So, we pitched in a lot, and we tried to be able to pitch everywhere like it was a pro system. ... I think it helped me get ready for pro ball a little earlier.”

He could have signed with Texas after his junior season when he was a 23rd round pick by the Rangers. A year later, the Rockies drafted him in the 24th round.

The Rockies, he said, are getting a better pitcher.

“I definitely feel like all of my pitches are better than they were the year before,” he said. “My cutter’s a lot better. My change-up’s a lot better.”

Mason says of his fastball, “I won’t blow it by you,” but he’s confident he can hit his spots and set up his other pitches with it.

“I think I have a good mix, and I think I locate pretty well,” he said.

Having the opportunity to play professionally, Mason praised his older brother for the role he played. Chris Mason Jr. is eight years older than Mike and was his little brother’s pitching coach all through high school and going back to about age 10, Mike said.

“He realized that I was a lefty when I was young, and I could kind of throw it a little bit,” Mike said. “He kind of molded me into having some decent mechanics and taught me a few pitches that have gotten me where I am today.”

 

— Tim Harty


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