Think pink: Local’s book makes playing golf more entertaining for players of all levels

Ted Boothroyd’s new book makes golf more interesting for players. The Gentleman’s Game of Pink Ball Golf makes players play with a pink ball for any number of infractions - from having the highest score on a hole to cursing loudly in an angry manner.



Ted Boothroyd’s new book makes golf more interesting for players. The Gentleman’s Game of Pink Ball Golf makes players play with a pink ball for any number of infractions - from having the highest score on a hole to cursing loudly in an angry manner.



A portion of the Proceeds from Ted Boothroyd’s book will go to the John W. Nick foundation, which is dedicated to education of the risk of breast cancer in men.



Sports tend to be too serious.

Local golf enthusiast Ted Boothroyd says it’s OK to have a sense of humor when playing sports.

Boothroyd recently published The Gentleman’s Game of Pink Ball Golf, a book he hopes will spread his gospel of a different way to take on the golf course.

“There are a lot of unwritten rules that are now written,” Boothroyd said. “It’s comedic-based, not that golf isn’t already funny to begin with.”

The basic premise of “pink ball golf” starts with the golfer who shoots the worst score on a hole is handed a pink golf ball on the next hole by his playing partners.

Boothroyd said he first played the game four years ago, before it blossomed into his 70-page rulebook.

“I was playing with some friends and we started by giving whoever played the worst hole the pink ball, but then it became ‘what if we do this or what if we do that?’ ” Boothroyd said. “After awhile I said, ‘I’ll tell you what, I can write a little bit, so I’ll go home and write a document on what the rules are.’ “

Boothroyd bases much of his game around fair play. Players are awarded the pink ball for taking a mulligan or accepting a “gimme” putt.

“In golf they do all kinds of things to embellish their scores, so pink ball addresses that element of the sport,” Boothroyd said. “It just says let’s have fun, let’s add the element of the pink ball for taking a mulligan or gimme.”

Boothroyd’s pink ball game focuses on approaching the sport relaxed. Actions worthy of being given the pink ball include throwing a club or any other golf equipment, striking a club against a tree, the ground, or another human, and cursing loudly in an angry manner.

“Any example of golf course rage and you carry the pink ball,” Boothroyd said.

Other pink ball infractions from the book include treating a golf cart like a hot rod, making lame excuses every time the player shanks a shot, and being habitually late to the first tee box.

“If you’re waiting for the last guy, he carries the ball from the beginning,” Boothroyd said. “It’s little fun things that make people play the game right.”

Boothroyd added that pink ball golf enhances the game for the competitive player and the leisure player.

“It adds to both because if you don’t like competition, it makes the leisure more fun, because you laugh a lot,” Boothroyd said. “If you are competitive, it adds to that, because you don’t want to be the one with the pink ball.”

Boothroyd’s own publishing company, Code Three Publications, published the book and he’ll be selling it at the Thursday night Downtown Farmers Market. He also plans to pursue listing on eBay and Amazon.com. Books are also available at pinkballgolf.com.

Pink ball players can add their own rules or modifications on the website.

“We have updates constantly,” Boothroyd said. “I got to a point where I was afraid to publish the book because I’d be behind on updates, but now I figure people can write me any updates and I’ll give them credit.”

A 67-year-old retired fire captain from Santa Rosa, Calif., Boothroyd moved to Grand Junction five years ago. Since the book is more for enjoyment than anything else, Boothroyd is giving a portion of the proceeds from the book to the John W. Nick Foundation, dedicated to education of the risk of breast cancer in men.

“I didn’t want to do this totally for myself, and I choose male breast cancer because I never had it, but I know some men who had it and didn’t make it,” Boothroyd said. “I found the John W. Nick foundation based out of Florida and I asked permission to be associated with it and they were excited.”


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