Area residents are nearly split on the $179.5 million bond measure put forth by District 51 to rebuild Grand Junction High School and improve other area schools, according to a poll at gjsentinel.com.

If passed, the bond measure would increase residential property taxes by about $80 per year on a $300,000 home, coming out to a little less than $7 a month.

Just more than half (52%) of respondents were against the bond measure, with 159 of the 216 no votes saying they don't trust District 51 with the money.

Facebook comments connected to the poll suggest voters were wary after a bond measure narrowly passed in 2017 to rebuild Orchard Mesa Middle School and improve other schools around the valley. Others say they don't trust the district after a failed administration reorganization attempt by former District 51 Superintendent Ken Haptonstall.

As for the yes votes (48%), 130 people said they are strong supporters of funding public education and another 68 said they're concerned with the condition and age of Grand Junction High School.

Want to weigh in? The poll is staying up for another week, so make sure to visit gjsentinel.com to vote. The poll is located in the right column on the home page. The poll is considered "open access" and does not meet the criteria for a true scientific poll.

NEXT WEEK

Be sure to check out Monday's photo page and gallery from the annual Meeker Sheepdog Trials. Christopher Tomlinson has some great photos from the event.

Also in Monday's Sentinel, the Colorado River Cleanup conducted by the Colorado Canyons Association had about 75 volunteers gathering debris from the riverbank from Palisade all the way to Fruita.

There was quite an event that happened 50 years ago in Garfield County. A 40-kiloton nuclear device was detonated about 8 miles southeast of Parachute on Sept. 10, 1969.

It was called Project Rulison and the device was set off approximately 1.6 miles beneath the surface. The goal of the project was to break loose natural gas in the area. The test accomplished the goal, but the natural gas was then determined to be contaminated.

The Sentinel will look back on this monumental event next week.

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