Rep. Matt Soper, R-Delta

Even though the same voting systems were used to elect such Republicans as U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert and state Rep. Matt Soper, some members of the GOP in Colorado are questioning the legitimacy of Tuesday’s Grand Junction City Council race.

Those objectors are all supporters of the four losing council candidates: Mark McCallister, Jody Green, Greg Haitz and Kraig Andrews, who all ran on a similar limited government platform.

“WE JUST LOST every single City Council Seat,” Grand Junction resident Cindy Paschal Ficklin posted on her Facebook page the day of the city election. Ficklin is an active member of Stand for the Constitution Grand Junction who has expressed an interest in running for the Colorado Legislature.

“Either we’ve already been overrun with Liberals ... or CONSERVATIVES didn’t vote!,” Ficklin added. “Or something else??”

That prompted Soper to post, “Were they using Dominion? This seems impossible!” and, “Cindy Paschal Ficklin we need to request a scan of every ballot and do a manual recount.”

Not long after being questioned about those posts by The Daily Sentinel, the posts were deleted.

Still, Soper defended writing them. “Many voters remain concerned about election integrity and whether the results are from a fair system,” Soper said. “Dominion was at the center of the 2020 election complaints, and if Dominion was used, it would be an opportunity to have an audit with the public observing. If the results are verified, it helps restore confidence.”

All election results automatically go through a risk limiting audit, but recounts only happen automatically if they are close — within 0.5% — or are at the request of a candidate, and paid for by that requester.

Dominion was only at the center of complaints because of false accusations of possible voter fraud, something for which there is no proof and which have led to the Denver-based company to file several multi-billion dollar lawsuits, which says it’s lost business as a result.

But more than that, the software and equipment used in the City Council election were the same used last fall and in numerous previous elections. Soper got re-elected and Boebert elected in counties that use them, but neither — nor anyone else — lodged complaints about those results.

All Colorado counties save two — Garfield and Douglas — use some form of Dominion products, and no complaints were filed against the company those two counties use.

A few days before the U.S. Capitol was stormed Jan. 6 by supporters of former President Donald Trump over his election loss, Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters, a Republican who oversees the county’s elections, questioned the integrity of Dominion products on her private Twitter account, @Behealthynow.

That post was in response to tweets written by U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Penn., who denounced his colleagues for their then-planned attempts to challenge the Electoral College certifying that President Joe Biden had won, which occurred the day the Capitol was attacked.

“Shame on you!” Peters wrote. “As one that administers elections in my county, you apparently have no idea how it is possible to 1) tabulate more than once ballots favoring a candidate 2) change algorithm in a voting machine (see Eric Coomer from Dominion’s Facebook ranks) UR Dirty or ignorant.”