A Utah state agency has begun holding hearings on a proposal to pipe water from the Green River in Utah to Colorado's Front Range.

The Division of Water Rights last week heard from project proponent Aaron Million and from numerous entities that oppose it, before deciding to request more information from Million before a decision can be made.

Million, a Fort Collins resident, filed the Utah application through the company Water Horse Resources LLC, seeking to divert 55,000 acre-feet a year and pipe it east to Wyoming and then south to Colorado.

The idea is being opposed by federal agencies including the Bureau of Reclamation, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Fish and Wildlife Service. Other opponents include western Colorado's Colorado River District, the Upper Yampa Water Conservancy District in Colorado, multiple water conservancy districts in Utah, conservationists, and notably the Utah Board of Water Resources and Division of Water Resources. That board works to conserve and develop the state's water, and is worried that the proposal would let Colorado benefit at Utah's expense.

"On our end we haven't heard anything from the state of Colorado saying that this project is needed," said Marcie Larson, spokeswoman for Utah's Division of Water Resources.

Peter Fleming, general counsel for the Colorado River District, questions the project's economic feasibility.

"Water Horse's application has not shown that it has any significant committed recipients who are willing to pay for the water that's supposed to be diverted," he said.

Million previously had proposed a higher-water-volume pipeline project from Flaming Gorge Reservoir to the Front Range, but the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied a preliminary permit application for it in 2012. That project had a hydropower component to it, and so does the current one.

The decision on Million's water right application will be made by Utah's state engineer, who heads the state's Division of Water Rights.

Million said he thought the hearing went well and he's awaiting a letter from the state engineer detailing what additional information is needed.

"We'll provide it and continue the path forward," he said.

He said probably one-third or one-half of the 28 or so objectors didn't show up at the hearing.

In the case of those who testified, "every point they made we've already looked at inside and out and so we'll answer the issues related to the permit and move on," he said.

A 30-day comment period will be provided after Million responds to the request for more information.

Ariel Calmes, a staff attorney for Western Resource Advocates, said in a news release after the hearing, "This application is the latest episode in Aaron Million's decade-long effort to profit off of the private sale of Green River water. Million is proposing to divert water from Utah to the detriment of multistate water agreements, the recovery of endangered species, and millions of dollars in recreation spending."

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