Open letter to Congresswoman Boebert

Other than your mindless rants about defending freedom and the Constitution, a document you seem to little understand, can you please explain your rationale and identify the sources that made you object to the vote in Pennsylvania? I am sure you carefully considered the implications of disenfranchising the voters of Pennsylvania.

During the Second World War my father, a Navy officer, was briefly assigned to the 28th Infantry Division at Camp Pickett, Virginia, in order to hone that unit's skills at close air support. This division had its roots as a National Guard unit in Pennsylvania. At the Battle of the Bulge they took the brunt of the German assault and my father lost many of his friends. I consider it my responsibility to make sure their voices, the voices of their children, their grandchildren, and great grandchildren are heard unhindered and not so frivolously dismissed by an elected official from the state of Colorado with a penchant for Machiavellian malice and deceit who bases her arguments on sloppy and misleading evidence.

BILL RUNYON

Northglenn


Kerosene or kindness

Many recent letters have been very harsh and full of blame. Let’s all take a time out and take a deep breath. Can we agree that we can’t continue name-calling and yelling at each other if we are to solve the serious problems we face. To paraphrase an old engineering saying: “For every serious and complicated problem there is a simple solution, that is usually wrong.”

If we are to work toward reform of economic and social injustice, we must work together to fix these complicated issues. For example, you’ve heard “most welfare recipients are minorities that are too lazy to work.” In fact the majority are white and work at minimum wage jobs. Let’s put away blame and hate speech (kerosene) and try kindness and understanding.

A good start is to avoid labels. It is not Republican or Democrat, red or blue, liberal or conservative; it is just us trying to make our lives and communities better. Take a vacation from protesting. Meet with a person with a different viewpoint and share ideas and facts without judgement.

The past is history, let it go. The future needs us to work together.

We are more alike than we are different!

SYLVESTER SLOWIK

Grand Junction


Boebert can help address Colorado's drought-related challenges

Southwest Colorado is in a drought of exceptional level according to a map released Jan. 7 by the US Drought Monitor, the most severe level of drought intensity categories.

Drought affects Colorado's agriculture: crop yields are stunted, large-scale hay shortages occur, ranchers sell off livestock before maturity, irrigation reservoir and agriculture pond levels decrease or dry up completely.

Drought affects our tourism, with less snow pack and shorter snow seasons in winter and low flows in rivers and lakes affecting recreation in summer.

By far our greatest threat from drought is wildfires, affecting our natural resources and our economy.

Rough estimates of fire suppression costs in Colorado just in 2020 add up to over $200 million.

Climate change increases the odds of drought worsening now, and in the decades ahead. Especially at risk in the US Southwest. Warmer temperatures increase evaporation from soil. Very dry soils and diminished plant cover can further suppress rainfall in an already dry area.

Decreasing our carbon emission pollution levels requires effective national legislation. I encourage our Rep Lauren Boebart to use her voice and vote to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Our future droughts levels and economy depend on it.

SUSAN ATKINSON

Durango


Lauren Boebert must be expelled from Congress

Congresswoman and Trump sycophant from Colorado District 3, Lauren Boebert, days after the siege at our nation’s Capitol, continues to spew lies and vitriol about the outcome of the 2020 general election and is also culpable for triggering, in her “twitter code”, the insurgency we witnessed Wednesday, Jan. 6.

Leading up to siege, Boebert encouraged her fellow sycophants with tweets about firing Nancy Pelosi, the electoral certification process would be a “1776,” and during the siege, communicated where Speaker Pelosi would NOT be found, as if directing the anarchists to look elsewhere.

Boebert’s distorted fascination carrying her Glock into Congress was recently promoted as a victory on her official government’s website. Nothing could be further from the truth. Boebert is NOT permitted to carry her weapon into the House Chamber, the Senate Chamber, the Rayburn room, and specific corridors within the Capitol.

She has further misled her constituents in the aftermath of storming the Capitol stating Capitol rioters were “not conservatives.” During her 4 minute and 22 second screech on the House floor, disavowing her Constitutional duty to certify the electoral votes, she stated she had her constituents with her outside.

It would be in the best interest of CD3’s constituents for Boebert to resign her position. Should she not do so, it is my hope Congresswoman Cori Bush’s (D Missouri) House Resolution be adopted that would expel Boebert from Congress.

Boebert, as has been published previously, has a history of lawlessness with previous arrests, and, is a clear and present danger not only to Colorado District 3, but to our country. She must be removed.

LISA KATZE-FANGER

Wolcott


Youthful Herman has right vision to serve on City Council

My husband and I were delighted to learn that Abe Herman has announced his candidacy for City Council. We know Abe and have relied on him as a source of information about community issues. Abe has the ability to see all sides of an issue and is willing to listen to a full range of viewpoints. In addition to being active in the community, Abe is a successful young entrepreneur with a business here in Grand Junction.

Abe wants to serve on our City Council in order to take an active role in preserving the character of our wonderful city while bettering schools, parks, and opportunities for small business. He understands the importance of preserving what we love about Grand Junction, including our reasonable cost of living and business friendly environment. In short, Abe Herman is exactly what we need on the Grand Junction City Council right now. We are delighted to support him.

MARTIE EDWARDS

Grand Junction


Herman can improve our civic health

The siege from domestic terrorists at our Capitol on Wednesday has evoked in my mind the dichotomy of two conflicting emotions, powerless and powerful.

I felt powerless watching the violence unfold at our nation’s Capitol, along with fear and embarrassment. However, on the other hand, I also feel powerful in speaking up for local government leadership. This is something I can do.

I choose to support Abe Herman running for Grand Junction City Council. He is qualified, kind and committed to make his city grow in a responsible way. The Sentinel New Year’s Day editorial, LOVE THY NEIGHBOR, said it perfectly when reflecting on the public health and the civic health of our community. Civic health is respecting each other and working together for the common good, which describes Abe Herman.

Abe has demonstrated a commitment to help others where they are, a person with integrity who will work with all parts of our community. Among many other worthwhile endeavors, he organized the Adaptive Climbing Wall of Grand Junction for Veterans, as well as children and adults with disabilities. Our son, with multiple challenges, learned to reach the top of the wall with pride and joy. We are impressed by the volunteers Abe has attracted to help fulfill this goal with enthusiasm and joy. Good people gravitate to him. He has made a difference in our lives.

Abe is a strong, intelligent and kind man who can bring people together for the common good and that is why I choose to support him and recognize the positive power I have to support him for GJ City Council.

KAREN SUGARMAN HUBER

Grand Junction


We need better integration of existing facilities, not a rec center

The city asked a consultant, Greenplay, LLC. to design us what would we really don’t need, voted we didn’t want, a behemoth recreation center to rival Fruita and Montrose? We grew up recreating “outside,” told to play outside or our brains would turn to mush. We have many more amenities available — outside. Are we trying to make it more attractive with indoor cycling and deleting open space?

“Christmas treeing” a thing by hanging more flashy things on it to make it more attractive won’t sell it. Costs have been and will be the high hurdle for this project. And while checking out Greenplay’s web site, I found it interesting the types of projects I identified in a quick over view of their 600 projects they have been involved with. Most were for places that didn’t have outdoor amenities (congested communities) and a few that had beautiful outdoor locations, they planned around that.

We have many amenities that should be incorporated into a “network” integrating what we already have. Part of that integration would be utilizing our recreation network already developed. The pedestrian pathway or bicycle path along the river front to the west end, the middle along the river front, and to the east end. It now extends up the mesa! These were good types of things I saw Greenplay plan. Good locations along its path for in-filling development and not burdening transportation.

What did we ask them to plan for us? A recreation center? We have a transportation corridor that incorporates open spaces with beautiful amenities that are unique to Colorado through an original plan that hasn’t yet realized it’s potential. There’s transportation by water, bike, foot or vehicle along this route. It’s spread out to reduce crowding that can occur at satellite parks like Canyon View or the single Lincoln Park Pool! If built out at Lincoln Park this will only add to congestion on North Ave. like we have during JUCO. Easy access is key to successfully recreating. It shouldn’t be like I-70 from Denver just to get to the mountains.

There is an ice rink along the river front, an existing indoor swimming pool and a gymnasium. If we spent a couple of million to upgrade the OM pool and rink, it would be good for another 40 years. And it’s total will cost less than $20 million for at least the next 40 years.

PAUL MULDOWNEY

Grand Junction


Herman for City Council

Abram Herman is exactly what Grand Junction needs at this time to serve on our city council. Abram is extremely smart, well spoken, well informed and an excellent listener. He owns and operates his own small business so he has considerable experience in budgeting and customer service. He volunteers his time mentoring youth in the community and has spent many hours dealing with the homeless issues in Grand Junction. He loves Colorado and could have settled anywhere in the state but decided to buy his house and operate his business in Grand Junction and wants to see the community thrive. He has my vote and I hope he can count on you for yours.

JOHN SINCLAIR

Grand Junction

Recommended for you